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9Turns out, prices don't really affect gasoline demand

We've been hearing for a while that the steady drop in US fuel prices are hurting sales of fuel-efficient cars like hybrids and plug-ins. As far as driving habits, though? Lower prices are the pump are having little impact on how much people are behind the wheel, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA).

48This Labor Day, low gas prices mean more cars on the road [w/video]

It's not hard to understand, when gas prices go up, Americans sometimes drive less on national holidays. This year, though gas prices are lower than they have been right before Labor Day since 2010, and that means the American Automobile Association (AAA) is predicting that the number of people taking a road trip of more than 50 miles is expected to rise compared to last year. AAA says that 35 million people will make a 50+ mile trip this year, the highest number since 2008 and up 1.3 percent fr

27E85 availability increasing across US, especially outside Midwest

E85. It's not just for flyover states anymore. That could be the newest slogan of the 85-percent ethanol blend now that the biofuel is proliferating in areas other than the Midwestern corn-growing states.

13EIA: 2012 monthly average shows U.S. using less gas than at any time since 2007

124,000 barrels of oil a day sure sounds like a lot, doesn't it?

17U.S. ethanol output dips... again

After falling to its lowest per-day output level in 2011, you might think that ethanol production would rebound. Well, that's not the case as U.S. ethanol production dipped again last week while as export demand depleted stocks by nearly three percent.

AddEIA: U.S. greenhouse gas emissions drop by record-setting 5.8% in 2009

Total U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions measured in at 6,576 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2009, a record-setting decrease of 5.8 percent from the 2008 level, according to a report released last week by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). This marks the largest annual decline in total U.S. GHG emissions since the EIA started reporting this data in 1990. EIA Administrator, Richard Newell, says that the drop in emissions was, "driven by the economic dow

58DOE: Oil will average $99/barrel by end of 2012; gas $3.29 per gallon

According to the DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA), crude oil prices are expected to steadily increase over the next two years, hitting $99 per barrel by the end of 2012. Tightening of world oil markets, along with a growth in consumption, will continue to drive oil prices up from the recorded average of $89 a barrel in December 2010 to an estimated $93 per barrel for 2011.

AddDOE: Oil will average $99/barrel by end of 2012; gas $3.29 per gallon

According to the DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA), crude oil prices are expected to steadily increase over the next two years, hitting $99 per barrel by the end of 2012. Tightening of world oil markets, along with a growth in consumption, will continue to drive oil prices up from the recorded average of $89 a barrel in December 2010 to an estimated $93 per barrel for 2011.

AddOfficial prediction: gas will hit $3 this summer in U.S.

It's still awful cold in most parts of the country, and the DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA) is looking ahead to summer. What do they see? $3 gallons of gas in the U.S. This isn't much of a jump from today's national average – and it's quite a drop from the highs of summer 2008 – but it could forecast some tough times ahead for people with gas-hungry vehicles. For all of 2010, the EIA's "Short-Term Energy Outlook" is predicting that gas will cost $2.84 per gallon. In 201

38REPORT: Energy Department predicting summer gas price high of just $2.30/gallon [w/POLL]

Click on the image above to take our summer of 2009 gas price poll

AddEnergy Department predicting summer gas prices to hit high of just $2.30/gallon

We've heard it a million times: What's good for GM is good for America. Well, if low gas prices are good for America (and that is a debatable point), then Charles Wilson's saying does not work the other way around. The U.S. Energy Information Administration is predicting that gasoline prices will hover around $2.23-$2.42 between now and the end of 2010, with a summer high of just $2.30 this year. Why does GM care about this? Because they need higher prices to make the Chevy Volt appealing. GM ha

AddDecline in U.S. summer gas use expected for first time in 17 years

Photo by X-eyedblonde. Licensed under Creative Commons license 2.0.

AddU.S. Gov't: did we say $3.50 for a gallon of gas by Spring? Our bad, it'll actually be $2.50

Ah. Spring. Astronomically, it ... wait a minute. Spring, EIA forecast ...? I just wrote about this Jan. 9. As you can see here, the EIA predicted $3.50 for a gallon of gas by June, the end of Spring. Are they changing their forecasts already? YES! According to Reuters demand for gas has dropped a lot (2.4 percent last week) and EIA analyst Doug MacIntyre "said he 'certainly' expects that his agency next month will publish lower spring gasoline price forecasts." So it worked? Did higher gas pric

AddIs this trip really necessary?

AutoblogGreen is about keeping a self-selected group of auto enthusiasts informed about the latest advances in green auto technologies. We are the early adopters, the best-informed among our friends, the trend setters. But, in the great scheme of things, we are too few. In the great battle (and that is what it is) for the remaining petroleum resources in the world, we are small change. What is needed is a much larger group of people who think it is important to be green now, and to self-ration f

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