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4EPA: 2014 renewable fuel standards 'significantly delayed'

Biofuel Producers Get Happy, Frustrated

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is not going to decide just yet how much biofuel to add to the national fuel supply in the future. Last year, the EPA said, for the first time ever, that it might reduce the biofuel component in American gas, but is now saying that the 2014 standards rule will be "significantly delayed."

28Republican control of Congress could affect US biofuel policy, Uber and Lyft

To Be Sure, The Future Is Unclear

Green transportation issues were not at the top of this year's midterm elections in the US, but the sweeping Republican victories – and probably new Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell – could affect at least some aspects of how we get around without using as many resources as we used to.

AddAMA points to EPA document to prove ethanol damages small engines

The fight over converting the national supply of gasoline from a maximum 10-percent ethanol blend (known as E10) to E15 have quieted down somewhat when it comes to passenger cars. For other applications - like "motorcycles and nonroad products" - the struggle continues.

AddLook Before You Pump warnings popping up at ethanol stations

Some of the largest retailers in the US are trying to inject either a little good sense or paranoia into part of their customer base. Lowe's, Walmart and True Value are putting out written warnings about the dangers of filling up non-light-duty-vehicle engines with fuel that contains a higher ethanol blend. It's all part of a campaign backed by the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), which represents 100 small-engine, utility vehicle and outdoor power equipment makers.

AddOver 11,000 comments filed on EPA's ethanol rules; White House also involved

In late 2013, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed – for the first time ever – a slight slacking of the 2014 renewable fuel standard. The reason was that the US is coming up on the 'blend wall,' the overall level of ethanol in the national gasoline supply where adding any more biofuel would push the average blend in 'normal' gas above 10 percent. As we know, this is a contentious issue. So contentious that, as the EPA collects comments about the rule change, almost 1

AddFord finds flex-fuel engine design plays big role in emissions output

How bad is ethanol for your engine? There's been a lot of debate on this issue as the US considers upping the biofuel content in the national gasoline supply from 10 percent (E10) to 15 percent (E15). The ethanol industry and some scientists say higher ethanol blends show no "meaningful differences" in new engines while the oil industry says ethanol creates health risks. Researchers working at the Ford Research and Innovation Center decided to take a closer look at how a wide range of gas-ethano

AddFor 2014, many automakers already prepared for E15

Many automakers are already and quietly ready for E15.

AddHigher ethanol blends create health, safety risks, says Big Oil-funded study

In the simplest terms, when higher-ethanol blend fuels spill, they can make buildings go boom. And the study that says this was funded, in part, by Chevron and Shell as well as the American Petroleum Institute, while the report was generated by Rice University in Houston. All clear on the players? Good. Let's proceed.

AddBiofuel supporters clamor EPA to change course on RFS

A public meeting room was packed recently as the US Environmental Protection listened to comments about its recent Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) decision. About 300 people packed the room, and the two sides were clearly marked. Some people were biofuel producers or Iowa farmers wearing "Don't Mess with RFS" buttons; others wore "Save my Engine" t-shirts handed out by Energy Citizens, a group funded by American Petroleum Institute.

AddEPA eases off ethanol, a bit, for first time ever

Forget raising the national ethanol blend in standard gasoline to 15 percent (E15), the Environmental Protection Agency has, for the first time ever, proposed reducing the ethanol requirement in the American gas supply.

AddAAA once again calls on feds to slow down E15 implementation

AAA is continuing its assault against higher ethanol use in the transportation energy, speaking out in support of reducing the renewable fuel mandate for 2014. The organization said that renewable-fuel requirements need to be lowered to avoid the so-called "blend wall" that could drive up gas prices. In addition to the threat of such higher prices, AAA continued to call gasoline with a 15 percent ethanol blend, or E15, "potentially damaging" to vehicles compared to the typical 10-percent blend b

AddNREL says E10, E15 show no 'meaningful differences' in new engines

A 50-percent increase in alcohol content may knock even the most seasoned drinker off of his (or her) feet, but a 50-percent jump in ethanol won't throw off a car's engine. That's the short version of a new National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) report, and we expect pro-ethanol advocates to use it frequently against Big Oil and its efforts to roll back increased ethanol mandates. The caveat, of course, is that the NREL study was sponsored by the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA), so we und

AddRFA: ethanol cuts gas prices by up to $1.50 a gallon

The Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) is giving us up to 2.6 trillion reasons why blending ethanol with the US fuel supply are a good thing for the economy. Citing former Ford and Carter administration energy advisor Philip Verleger, the RFA estimates that gas would be between 50 cents and $1.50 more per gallon than its costs today. That means that Americans are saving $700 million a year on the low end and $2.6 trillion on the high end.

AddEPA: 10% of all US fuel now renewable, but that might be our limit

recognizes that ethanol will likely continue to predominate the renewable fuel pool in the near future, and that for 2014 the ability of the market to consume ethanol in higher blends such as E85 is highly constrained as a result of infrastructure- and market-related factors. EPA does not currently foresee a scenario in which the market could consume enough ethanol sold in blends greater than E10, and/or produce sufficient volumes of non-ethanol biofuels to meet the volumes of total renewable fu

AddOhio gas station accidentally sells pure ethanol as gasoline

The US Department of Energy lists 91 stations in the state of Ohio that dispense an 85-percent ethanol blend (aka E85). Unfortunately, one unlisted station in the Buckeye State took the biofuel a step further earlier this week. The GetGo station in Brunswick, about 25 miles southwest of Cleveland, accidentally served pure ethanol from its 87-octane tanks. An estimated 500 cars were served the ol' moonshine between Sunday afternoon and Monday morning, the Ohio's Medina Gazette reports.

AddCongress may change, or even repeal, 2007 ethanol mandate

The battle over selling a higher ethanol blend of gasoline in light-duty vehicle fuel is back in the headlines, as some members of Congress are now suggesting an overhaul of the 2007 ethanol mandate, the Detroit News says.

AddFlorida repeals law requiring 10% ethanol blend in gasoline

It looks like ethanol – especially when blended into gasoline – is facing some pushback. Florida has decided to repeal its Renewable Fuel Standard, which had required all gasoline sold in the state to be blended with nine-to-10 percent ethanol or other alternative fuels.

AddColorado ethanol producer Front Range Energy moves from corn to woody biomass

The Environmental Protection Agency continues to give the green light to E15, but the biofuel doesn't have to come from corn ethanol. The exact source of the ethanol in gasoline – whether its 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 15 percent (E15) – isn't impacting the E15 debate, it does in the "food vs. fuel" debate, and that's why a potential solution coming out of Colorado caught our eye.

AddEPA approves new blender pump for E15 fuel stations, 4-gallon rule still in effect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) this week outlined the conditions gas station operators need to meet to sell higher-ethanol gasoline from so-called "blender pumps" that may dispense gasoline with both 10 percent and 15 percent ethanol (E10 and E15, respectively).

AddAs E15 fight continues, arguments getting stronger and stranger

The fight over whether corn ethanol in gasoline sold in the US should be increased to E15 – a blend of 15 percent ethanol mixed with 85 percent gasoline – from its current state of E10 (ten percent), has been getting uglier lately, all over the place. The US Environmental Protection Agency has given the green light to E15 for 2001 model year or later vehicles, as stated on pump stickers where the fuel is avaiable. In November, AAA released a statement expressing concerns about damage

AddIowa newspaper finds no problems using E15; biofuel could have saved drivers $69m

There's been a lot of concern expressed over the potentially damaging impact on engines that E15 – gasoline with 15 percent ethanol – could have on vehicle engines. AAA most recently sounded an alarm on the issue – the organization says that sale of E15 gasoline should be postponed until consumers can be educated on the fuel – and using the fuel can void the warranty in some vehicles.

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