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433Toyota fires bullets into hydrogen fuel tanks, shoots down EV supporters

Many gearheads will remember that the 1970s-era Dodge Dart's claim to fame was that its motor was so durable (though not necessarily powerful) that one could shoot bullets into the engine block. Decades later, Toyota has taken a page out of that testing process.

27Why a Florida field is important to your car's paint

If you've ever wondered how automakers know their paints will stand up to the test of time, a field in Florida may have your answer. Manufacturers routinely turn to Q-Lab, a facility situated on a 20-acre open field just outside of Homestead, Florida for durability testing. There, the company's engineers apply automotive paint to twelve-inch by 4-inch metal panels and leave them to bake in the unforgiving sun. The facility's location next to Everglades National Park is ideal for testing paint fa

29Charge! GM gives update on Volt development, describes interior

If the Chevy Volt were a 150 mpg dairy cow, the General's marketing department would have a hand on every udder. The Volt is still more than two years from production, and the series hybrid is all over the Internet, TV, and magazines. When a vehicle promises as much as the Volt does, though, any update is big news. This time, engineers have come up with a computer algorithm to accelerate battery durability testing. The test decreases battery testing from ten years to two by duplicating real-life

AddEditorial: Why the carmakers seem to be dragging their feet on batteries

digg_url = 'http://digg.com/hardware/This_is_why_major_carmakers_seem_to_be_dragging_their_feet_on_batteries'; The big auto-makers, particularly the US-based companies, take a lot of grief over their environmental policies, rightfully so in many respects. But they also get a bad rap. One of the big topics that crops in the comments here at AutoblogGreen is "How come Auto-Maker X isn't using batteries from Company Y instead of messing around with all this other technology?" There has undoubtedl

7High tech equals high repair costs - just like it's always been

Any time that we start to see a hint of paradigm shift in the auto industry, it's mandatory that the detractors come out of the woodwork with stories of woe. For example, in the article linked below, we learn that someone can get taken for a $8,000 ride to replace one of Toyota's hybrid transmissions.

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