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12Honda shines the spotlight on Project Drive-In success

Project Drive-In, a Honda-sponsored campaign to save drive-in theaters across the country, is beginning to bear fruit, as the first theaters have been informed that they'll be getting free digital projectors. Many theaters still use 35-millimeter film, which is being phased out rather aggressively in the movie industry. The move to digital, meanwhile, requires nearly a six-figure investment, forcing many drive-ins to close up shop for good.

46Honda launches Project Drive-In to save these American icons

Honda wasn't really a major player in the automotive industry when drive-in movie theaters were popular in the US, but the automaker is doing its best to preserve the place where automotive and cinema histories collide. Using Project Drive-In, Honda is helping bring awareness to a story we brought up last month, where we saw how a move away from 35-millimeter film could put some of the few drive-in theaters remaining in the US out of business.

49Lack of 35mm film, replacement parts putting hurt on America's drive-ins [w/poll]

Drive-in movie theaters turn 80 years old this summer, and, soon, they might die of old age. There are only 360 drive-in theaters left in the US – down from 4,000 at their peak in 1958 – and the 35-millimeter film projectors that they use to screen movies are quickly losing support from studios, which have switched to digital methods of capturing pictures.

AddLights Out: Guerilla Drive-In uses BMW sidecar motorcycle to host secret movie screenings

Che Guevarra's image has been transformed by the very capitalism he railed against into something non-threatening enough that the totem has been given a pair of 3-D spectacles and serves as a logo for a rebel band of film enthusiasts. Meet the Guerilla Drive-In.

2Lights Out: Guerilla Drive-In uses BMW sidecar motorcycle to host secret movie screenings

As hardcore as they come, Che Guevarra's image has been transformed by the very capitalism he railed against into something non-threatening enough that the totem has been given a pair of 3-D spectacles and serves as a logo for a rebel band of film enthusiasts. In sharp contrast to what the retail-industrial complex continues to try selling us, there are those that prefer the more organic charms of a beaten, scratched, oft-repaired and aged release print of any given movie, ratty-sounding optical

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