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23Feds chastise Marchionne over Jeep recall, only 13% repaired so far

Following the significant outcry surrounding the General Motors and Takata airbag safety crises this year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration seems to be taking a much more aggressive role in pushing owners to repair their recalled vehicles. In the agency's latest move, it's urging Jeep drivers to get their models fixed. Acting NHTSA administrator David Friedman even sent a letter to Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne pressing him to get more of the SUVs fixed.

11Obama administration eyeing new NHTSA boss after safety lapses

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration hasn't had much to celebrate this year. The botched handling of major recall campaigns from General Motors and for faulty Takata airbag inflators haven't put the agency in the best light. Also, its new VIN lookup for safety campaigns, which should have been a major step forward, crashed the first time it was really needed. Clearly, something must be done, and it appears that the government's solution might be an overhaul of the bureau, starting

11NHTSA undergoing Congressional scrutiny over Takata scandal

With the Takata airbag debacle still yet to be resolved, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has found itself in hot water again. Parties both from within and from without the agency's ranks are asking hard questions about NHTSA's handling of the widespread recall, and now the agency's leadership will have to answer some of those hard questions.

21No heads have rolled at NHTSA over GM ignition switch recall scandal

At this point, there's little question that General Motors deserves the bulk of the blame for not recalling the millions of vehicles affected by the ignition switch problem earlier than it did. And to a large degree, GM is facing the music and accepting blame for its mistakes, even if that acceptance won't bring back the 13 or more deaths attributed to the faulty components. But does GM deserve all the blame?

24NHTSA chief says it's 'likely' more than 13 died due to GM ignition switch

One of the major points of contention in the GM ignition switch debacle has centered around just how many people were killed due to the problem. GM claimed, and continues to claim, that 13 people have been killed. Safety advocates and lawyers, though, are arguing that the final total will likely be higher.

31GM agrees to $35M fine over ignition switch recall delay

Automaker Also Agrees To 'Unprecedented Oversight' By NHTSA

General Motors has agreed to a $35-million fine levied by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration following its delayed reporting of the deadly ignition switch problem that has affected millions of the company's vehicles.

30NHTSA chief says GM held 'critical information'

Federal officials say the agency charged with ensuring the safety of cars in America was missing key information when it decided against a deeper investigation of General Motors in 2007.

24Feds to end roadside breath testing without permission

"I'm concerned that motorists who encounter these surveys are not properly informed the survey is voluntary." - Rep. Tom Petri

105DOT and NHTSA push for vehicle-to-vehicle communication

Your car is about to get a lot more chatty. The Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced today that Vehicle-To-Vehicle (V2V) technologies will be coming to all new cars. At some point in the future. Most likely.

7Promoting Electric Vehicles Act of 2010 under discussion on the Hill now

Going on now in Washington, D.C.: testimony before the Full Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources regarding plug-in vehicles. Specifically, the hearing is about S. 3495, the Promoting Electric Vehicles Act of 2010, and is intended to "receive testimony on policies to reduce oil consumption through the promotion of accelerated deployment of electric-drive vehicles." Hey, that sounds like it could be important.

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