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General Motors' spate of announcements this morning was bad news for enthusiasts (e.g. the shuttering of Pontiac) and even worse for GM's debt-for-equity swap (without a 90% take-rate the automaker is bound for CH 11). But for dealerships and workers, GM's re-revised restructuring plan is going to hurt... hard.

To ensure long-term viability, General Motors has pledged an arm and a leg (and maybe an eye) to satisfy conditions imposed by the federal government after the automaker received billions in taxpayer-funded loans. In addition to reducing debt and condensing the number and type of vehicles it produces, GM has promised to revamp labor contracts -- not an easy task. With that in mind, GM is entering historic talks and negotiations this week with the United Auto Workers, bondholders, dealers and oth

Chrysler has looked deep into it soul and decided to join the General and FoMoCo in an attempt to reduce its reliance on fleet sales. Chrysler's Vice Chairman, Jim Press (that still doesn't sound right), alluded to the reduction during a conference call regarding December sales figures and said, "you have to stay out of the 30-percent range and into the 20s." Where in "the 20s" was unspecified, but with vehicle sales expect to continue their decline this year, any reduction of income could hurt

Mark "the Mullet" Fields dropped some small ordinance during an interview with the Wall Street Journal today, saying that if the slow U.S. economy puts the automaker at risk of not meeting its financial goals for the next two years, it may increase the rate at which it will cut costs.

According to the International Herald Tribune, Michigan physicians, hospitals and medical insurers have noted an increase in the number of elective surgery requests since last year. Replacements for knees, hips and shoulders were up by 20 percent at the Henry Ford Health System alone.

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