5 Articles
1 / 1
16

American news outlets are certainly full of updates from the voting in New Hampshire today, where the second first presidential primary in the 2008 U.S. election is taking place (UPDATE courtesy of J Jones: Iowa had a caucus, not a primary). Out in Vancouver, British Columbia, Silverado Green Fuel thought that today would be a good time to remind everyone about where the candidates stand on coal-to-liquid fuel (CTL). The company has released a collection of pro-CTL quotes from four presidential

Add

Following a conversation with Washington Congressman Jay Inslee, Grist blogger David Roberts set out to distinguish between coal gasification and coal-to-liquid (CTL) production. Inslee believes CTL supporters are engaging in a plot to confuse legislators by positioning CTL under a "clean coal" blanket along with gasification. Roberts admitted he confused the two terms in previous writings, and I'll confess I never realized the dramatic differences. So take a look at the Gristmill and follow som

5

Over at EcoGeek, Hank Green has a response to the recent MSNBC/Newsweek article about liquefied coal. Coal-to-liquid fuel is very controversial topic because the United States has huge quantities of coal in the ground, and it's relatively cheap to extract, at least compared to most other options. The problem is that coal, like petroleum, is a fossil fuel, which means that burning it (or a derivative) releases huge amounts of carbon into the atmosphere that would otherwise remain locked up tight

Add

SeekingAlpha investment advisor Charles Morand is maybe, possibly thinking about betting on synfuels, specifically coal-to-liquid (CTL) synfuels made by Headwaters, Syntroleum Corp, Sasol and Rentec. He has a rundown of each company on this page. While the headline reads "Four Stocks to Watch," implying these are good investment opportunities, Morand's write-up makes CTL investment seem like a losing proposition, at least right now.

3

I don't like the wording in Slate's headline for this great story on the Fischer-Tropsch coal-to-liquid process (is it really "one of the world's most exciting new fuel sources"? Is it really even new if it was developed in the 1920s?), but I still encourage you to read the story. The world is a complicated place, and Daniel Gross' investigation of how Fischer-Tropsch moved from Nazi synthfuel to the fuel of choice for South Africa's state run energy company emphasizes this. The company, Sasol,

1 / 1
Share This Post

Ctl Questions

There are no questions about this topic.
Be the first to ask!

From Our Partners