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42BMW i3 misses top Euro safety rating [w/videos]

The Euro NCAP just tested a recent batch of new cars including the 2014 BMW i3, and the EV Bimmer scored less-than-perfect results. Though not horrible, BMW's all-electric/range-extended i3 was given a four-star (out of five possible) crash rating due to concerns with front-occupant whiplash and side-impact protection.

94Chrysler defies NHTSA, says it won't recall 2.7M Jeep Grand Cherokee, Liberty models

Facing a possible recall totaling around 2.7 million of its most popular SUVs, Chrysler remains insistent that the 1993-2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee and 2002-2007 Jeep Liberty are safe vehicles. This comes on the heels of a recall request from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for these two models due to fuel tanks mounted behind the rear axle, which could possibly be ruptured during severe rear-end collisions, leading to an increased risk of fire. In response to the allegations, Ch

33Mitsubishi Lancer, Outlander Sport named 2013 IIHS Top Safety Picks

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has added a pair of Mitsubishi models to its ever-growing list of 2013 Top Safety Picks, giving the prestigious safety award to the 2013 Outlander Sport and Lancer (sedan and Sportback). Both models make a return visit to the list, but with 117 cars now on the list and IIHS crash standards getting tougher just about every, this is big news for the small Japanese automaker.

72Ford Escape, Mazda CX-5 earn four-star NHTSA crash rating

The 2013 Ford Escape and 2013 Mazda CX-5 are both impressive new crossovers that bring plenty to the table for buyers. Top safety marks, however, seem to have been left off of the menu.

114European NCAP crowns Volvo V40 safest new car ever tested

One of the safest cars ever built will not be sold in the United States. The Euro NCAP, similar to our National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, put the all-new 2013 Volvo V40 through a battery of crash tests and found that it is one of the safest cars it has tested.

17NHTSA may add extra credit to 5-star crash rating system

Do the star-based safety ratings of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration work? We'd point out that automakers work hard to ensure the best ratings possible, and recent data shows that our roads are now safer.

109IIHS finds sub-compacts fare poorly against mid-size sedans

IIHS crash tests – Click above for high-res image gallery

22Ford says new study shows SYNC leads to fewer distracted drivers

Ford has been winning sales with SYNC, but the infotainment interface may also save lives. We already knew that SYNC, when sync'd up with a Bluetooth-enabled phone, can call 911 for you in the event of an accident. Now, a report from the Blue Oval contends that SYNC can help prevent a collision from happening in the first place. Studies show that talking on the phone while driving can quadruple your chances of an accident, but with SYNC, drivers spend less time with their eyes off the road. The

115Same old shtick: IIHS wants to delay licenses for teens

It seems every year or two the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety publishes a study showing why 16-year-olds shouldn't be trusted with a driver's license. Yet every year, only New Jersey withholds the privilege of four-wheeled freedom until the age of 17.

AddLutz calls for crash test break so small cars can be brought to U.S.

With this year's rise in gas prices, sales of small fuel efficient cars have gone through the roof and companies like Ford and Honda are selling every single Civic, Fit and Focus they can produce. Over in other parts of the world, automakers have long sold many vastly more efficient cars that aren't available on American roads. American drivers aware of this are of course clamoring for these cars to be offered here, but since those vehicles aren't designed for the American market, automakers jus

17Flipside: Is crash safety endangering accident victims?

Crash safety ratings are a big selling point – who's going to buy a car with just two stars? In pursuit of salable collision performance, automakers have turned to stronger metals and better construction, and consumers can reap the benefit by choosing from a panoply of highly rated vehicles. A problem arises, however, if that safety design is ever called upon to perform. Lots of vehicles now sport high strength steel in critical areas like roof pillars, and while it certainly helps protect

52VW's Jetta jolting ad campaign a crashing success?

Those new Volkswagen television ads showing Jettas in realistic (and violent) crash scenarios appear to be working. VW reports that since the ads launched three weeks ago, requests for brochures at call centers and on the web are way up, and internet requests for price quotes have risen 59 percent.

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