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Audi helps drivers stay caffeinated on the road with its Espresso Mobil. The gadget hooks up to the 12-volt outlet and preps a hot brew within just two minutes.


The old joke about Starbucks is that there are so many of the coffee shops across America that in some places you can sit in one location sipping a pumpkin spice latte and actually be able see another one of its stores across the street. If you think the brand is everywhere now, it's going to be truly ubiquitous at three universities this fall with a pilot program that has food trucks serving coffee to caffeine-starved students and faculty.


For many of us, coffee runs our lives. Without the bitter, caffeinated brew, most of us wouldn't be able to get up in the morning or avoid fading in the afternoon. Now, new research from the University of Bath suggests we might want to get our cars as hooked on java as we are. Regardless of the variety of coffee used, the UK institution has found that coffee grounds are a great source to create biodiesel.


Let's be honest; without coffee, nothing would ever get done. The cup of joe has done more to boost productivity than just about anything else on the planet. However, Romanian artist Adrian Mitu has found a new use for java – making fascinating automotive art.


We're not sure Espresso Veloce makes anything else, but we're also not sure it needs to. This is the V12 coffeemaker, a java-dispensing chunk of aluminum, magnesium and titanium with pistons for cups. There will be just 500 of these made, sprung from the forge of the Arte Meccanica Mastrogiuseppe, after company founder Paolo Mastrogiuseppe.


Mini Netherlands wanted to give its countrymen a good reason to test drive its cars, so it threw in a free cup of coffee with the spin – but not just any old cuppa joe. Cars were fitted with a sensor that analyzed the driver's style. The chip was then placed in a special coffeemaker that produced a blend to match the driving; middle-of-the-road test pilots would get a lungo (long) coffee, test-the-rollcage types were given a ristretto (short, and stronger).


Company says it only works when car is parked

The humble cupholder has long been a basic accessory in a passenger car. Brewing something to fill it inside the vehicle? That's a more recent enhancement.


Generally speaking, until we've had at least twice of the FDA's recommended daily allowance of caffeine, we aren't as observant as we need to be. For instance, when we wrote about the newly announced Fiat 500L, we were so distracted by its massive glass roof, seating for five and the potential of six engine choices we totally overlooked a small, but buzzworthy option.


As it turns out, making a successful television show about cars is more difficult than it looks. Just ask Adam Carolla or the kids from the U.S. version of Top Gear. As we recently heard, Jerry Seinfeld has decided he should give the premise a go with Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, a new web series. If the concept sounds dull, brace yourself for the pointless teaser video below. True to its name, the show looks to feature comedy names like Ricky Gervais, Larry David, Michael Richards and Alec


We're gonna let you in on a little secret from our world over here. Most of the time we spend at auto shows, we're pretty busy bringing you the latest from the show floor. But everyone deserves a coffee brake, and when we need our caffeine fixes there's no shortage of automakers eager to one-up each other with the best cup of java. Ferrari's espressos consistently rank among the best of 'em. Only fitting then that the company of the Prancing Horse should have its own espresso machine, right?


This is what we mean when we say that the future of alternative fuels isn't anywhere close to being decided. A team from the BBC program Bang Goes the Theory has rigged an older Volkswagen Scirocco to run on coffee pellets. It's a bit complex, with the coffee grounds needing to be heated to 1,292 degrees Fahrenheit, and the resulting concoction cooled, separated and filtered before it's run to the engine. Because coffee contains carbon, however, it works.


There's more energy in that morning mochachino than just the caffeine. You know that bit of foam you get on the top of your espresso before you start adding all the steamed milk, sugar, and assorted flavorings to the point where you can't even taste the coffee anymore? That foam comes from the fact that coffee beans contain oil. Even after the beans are ground and brewed into assorted drinks, some of the oil still remains. As a biomass product with 15 percent oil in it, those leftover coffee gro


Aside from the next-gen Camaro, this is a concept some of us want to see in production as soon as possible.

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