21 Articles
1 / 1
6EPA levies another fine on engine importer for Clean Air Act violations

If nothing else, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is doing its best to ensure that not too much of that notorious Beijing smog wafts its way over here. The regulator once again smacked a China-based maker of recreational vehicles and engines with a penalty for violating the country's Clean Air Act. This time, it was American Lifan Industry.

26EPA fines Chinese recreational-vehicle maker $725,000 for excessive emissions

Two China-based companies and a US-based importer affiliate were fined a combined $725,000 by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for their roles in bringing in motorcycles and recreational vehicles from China that didn't comply with federal clean-air laws.

17Latest Honda promo film is a Never Ending Race against emissions

A new Honda promotional video shows clips of a hazy, smog-choked Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, and then gives the company credit for its lead role in cutting vehicle-emissions by a factor of one thousand since 1970. Self-serving? Sure. Then again, this LA-native reporter born in 1970 can't help but be somewhat appreciative.

68Supreme Court will hear case challenging EPA emissions rules

The Supreme Court will be offering up its thoughts on emissions, as the highest court in the land will hear a challenge to greenhouse gas regulations that were instituted by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2007. The New York Times refers to the case being heard by SCOTUS as "a sequel" to an earlier case, which mandated that the EPA would regulate greenhouse gases emitted by new cars and trucks, if it were proven those emissions posed a danger to public health.

12California companies fined $3.6 million for importing dirty ATVs

One California-based consultant just got busted for double-dipping on four-wheelers. Chi Zheng, whose Los Angeles-based companies MotorScience Inc. and MotorScience Enterprise Inc. specialized as a consultant for all-terrain vehicle imports from China, had his companies fined $3.6 million for violating emissions requirements, according to the US Department of Justice, US Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The companies were hit with a $3.55 million fin

AddDiesel engine manufacturers react to Navistar's Clean Air Act lawsuit

In a lawsuit filed in early July, Navistar, a U.S.-based manufacturer of heavy-duty diesel engines, accused U.S. Environmental Protection Agency director, Lisa Jackson, of not upholding the Clean Air Act and the Agency of not acting to protect public health. At issue is whether emissions-control systems that rely on a fluid (for example, a urea solution, commonly referred to as selective catalyst reduction or SCR) work in the real world, where the tanks may not be filled up.

AddNavistar sues EPA over Clean Air Act's diesel emissions rules

In a lawsuit filed earlier this month, Navistar, a U.S.-based manufacturer of heavy-duty diesel engines, accused U.S. Environmental Protection Agency director, Lisa Jackson, of not upholding the Clean Air Act and the Agency of not acting to protect public health.

Add3 Colorado companies fined $2.5 million for distribution of illegal gas

Last week, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Justice Department announced a settlement to resolve claims that Rocky Mountain Pipeline System, LLC, Western Convenience Stores, Inc. and Offen Petroleum, Inc. illegally mixed and distributed more than one million gallons of gasoline. The trio of companies will be required pay a $2.5 million civil penalty for the distribution of illegal gas that did not meet Clean Air Act emissions and fuel quality requirements.

AddReport: House panel attempting to block EPA from regulating tailpipe emissions

The Clean Air Act of 2007 gave the Environmental Protection Agency the right to regulate tailpipe emissions due to their dangers to public health. The law also gave states like California the right to set their own emissions policies; a move that could force automakers to meet several different standards in the U.S. alone. That led the federal government to essentially adopt California's standard, resulting in a mandate of 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016.

85Report: House panel attempting to block EPA from regulating tailpipe emissions

The Clean Air Act of 2007 gave the Environmental Protection Agency the right to regulate tailpipe emissions due to their dangers to public health. The law also gave states like California the right to set their own emissions policies; a move that could force automakers to meet several different standards in the U.S. alone. That led the federal government to essentially adopt California's standard, resulting in a mandate of 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016.

AddSell unclean engines, pay a fine: EPA issued $2 million penalty to PowerTrain

What is it with companies thinking they can get around the Clean Air Act? Earlier this year, the second-largest refinery in the U.S. was fined $5.3 million (and required to upgrade pollution control systems for $700 million) for CAA violations. Before that, companies like Pep Boys, Cummins and Mercedes (among others) were all forced to pay fines for selling products that are just plain dirtier than they should be.

AddE15 lawsuit against EPA gets support from big automakers

While not the most flashy of lawsuits, the battle over letting E15 (a fuel made up of 15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline) into the national fuel supply just got a lot bigger today. That's because the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers – the trade association that represents 12 major automakers – joined the suit, which was originally brought by the Association of International Automobile Manufacturers, the National Marine Manufacturers Association, and the Outdoor Power E

AddReport: EPA sued by food and farm groups over E15 fuel approval

Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency approved the use of E15, a 15-percent ethanol and 85-percent gasoline blend, in vehicles from model year 2007 and newer. Now, nine food and farm groups, along with the American Petroleum Institute, are suing the EPA over this decision. According to the two lawsuits filed, the use of E15 in cars, SUVs and light trucks violates the Clean Air Act. API's Bob Greco says testing on the safety of E15 being conducted by Department of Energy and auto

44Report: EPA sued by food and farm groups over E15 fuel approval

Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency approved the use of E15, a 15-percent ethanol and 85-percent gasoline blend, in vehicles from model year 2007 and newer. Now, nine food and farm groups, along with the American Petroleum Institute, are suing the EPA over this decision. According to the two lawsuits filed, the use of E15 in cars, SUVs and light trucks violates the Clean Air Act. API's Bob Greco says testing on the safety of E15 being conducted by Department of Energy and automakers

AddAs Clean Air Act turns 40, EPA claims new cars are up to 95 percent cleaner today than in 1970

The Clean Air Act has had a tremendous impact on the cars Americans drive and buy – and stands as a sentinel against groups, like Pep Boys, that violate the U.S.'s air quality. Not bad for a 40-year-old.

18Tesla Motors pays fine for lacking emissions Certificate of Conformity

Sometimes, technology moves faster than rules and regulations. For instance, in some parts of Kansas, shops must provide water troughs for horses. A more recently inanity is the requirement that electric vehicles receive an emissions "Certificate of Conformity" from the EPA to comply with the "Clean Air Act." And, while Kansan storekeepers have long been excused from abiding by the obviously obsolete ordinance, such is not the case for America's best known electric car maker, Tesla Motors.

AddTesla Motors pays huge fine for lacking emissions Certificate of Conformity

Sometimes, technology moves faster than rules and regulations. For instance, in some parts of Kansas, shops must provide water troughs for horses. A more recently inanity is the requirement that electric vehicles receive an emissions "Certificate of Conformity" from the EPA to comply with the "Clean Air Act." And, while Kansan storekeepers have long been excused from abiding by the obviously obsolete ordinance, such is not the case for America's best known electric car maker, Tesla Motors.

AddLas Vegas man falsified emissions tests, added to EPA's most wanted list

The image above looks strikingly similar to something you may see on an episode of America's Most Wanted where host John Walsh urges viewers to help find dangerous criminals at large. Though the crimes of Joseph DeMatteo may not be as violent those seen on an episode of Cops, his actions warrant enough concern that the Environmental Protection Agency has placed him on its most wanted list. We were a bit surprised to discover that the EPA has such a list but we promise it's no hoax. You can find

AddFinnish company Pegasor introduces real-time particulate sensor for diesel engines

Biodiesel is still in limbo here in the U.S., but even if we never return to large scale production, at least diesel vehicles can continue to get cleaner on their own. The latest example of cleaner diesel tech news comes from Finland, where Pegasor Ltd. has introduced a new, compact, continuously operating and real-time particulate matter (PM) sensor, known as PPS-M. Pegasor, which sounds like the name of really bitchin' one-legged T-Rex, says that the sensor can be installed in the engine exhau

1 / 1