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German automaker reaches settlement with US authorities over emissions cheating.

Volkswagen may buy back hundreds of thousands of vehicles and further compensate car owners as part of a deal reached with federal authorities suing over the company's intentional cheating on emissions testing.

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New rule would prohibit modifying certain vehicles for race purposes.

Republican lawmakers are warning that regulations proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency could cast a pall over auto racing.

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HR 4715, or the RPM Act, will protect street cars converted for competition from the Clean Air Act.

Congress has put forth a bill opposing the EPA's aggressive new view of the Clean Air Act, which would effectively prohibit converting road cars for racing.

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A clarification that doesn't do much to clear the air.

A statement provided by the EPA indicates that anyone who has modified their vehicle's emissions system, even if it will be used solely for competition purposes, has already broken the law.

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German Automaker Says It's Not Cheating This Time

Volkswagen has disputed new allegations that it installed software to circumvent emissions testing on SUV models with its 3.0-liter TDI sold in the United States.

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If nothing else, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is doing its best to ensure that not too much of that notorious Beijing smog wafts its way over here. The regulator once again smacked a China-based maker of recreational vehicles and engines with a penalty for violating the country's Clean Air Act. This time, it was American Lifan Industry.

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Two China-based companies and a US-based importer affiliate were fined a combined $725,000 by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for their roles in bringing in motorcycles and recreational vehicles from China that didn't comply with federal clean-air laws.

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A new Honda promotional video shows clips of a hazy, smog-choked Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, and then gives the company credit for its lead role in cutting vehicle-emissions by a factor of one thousand since 1970. Self-serving? Sure. Then again, this LA-native reporter born in 1970 can't help but be somewhat appreciative.

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The Supreme Court will be offering up its thoughts on emissions, as the highest court in the land will hear a challenge to greenhouse gas regulations that were instituted by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2007. The New York Times refers to the case being heard by SCOTUS as "a sequel" to an earlier case, which mandated that the EPA would regulate greenhouse gases emitted by new cars and trucks, if it were proven those emissions posed a danger to public health.

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One California-based consultant just got busted for double-dipping on four-wheelers. Chi Zheng, whose Los Angeles-based companies MotorScience Inc. and MotorScience Enterprise Inc. specialized as a consultant for all-terrain vehicle imports from China, had his companies fined $3.6 million for violating emissions requirements, according to the US Department of Justice, US Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The companies were hit with a $3.55 million fin

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In a lawsuit filed in early July, Navistar, a U.S.-based manufacturer of heavy-duty diesel engines, accused U.S. Environmental Protection Agency director, Lisa Jackson, of not upholding the Clean Air Act and the Agency of not acting to protect public health. At issue is whether emissions-control systems that rely on a fluid (for example, a urea solution, commonly referred to as selective catalyst reduction or SCR) work in the real world, where the tanks may not be filled up.

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In a lawsuit filed earlier this month, Navistar, a U.S.-based manufacturer of heavy-duty diesel engines, accused U.S. Environmental Protection Agency director, Lisa Jackson, of not upholding the Clean Air Act and the Agency of not acting to protect public health.

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Last week, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Justice Department announced a settlement to resolve claims that Rocky Mountain Pipeline System, LLC, Western Convenience Stores, Inc. and Offen Petroleum, Inc. illegally mixed and distributed more than one million gallons of gasoline. The trio of companies will be required pay a $2.5 million civil penalty for the distribution of illegal gas that did not meet Clean Air Act emissions and fuel quality requirements.

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The Clean Air Act of 2007 gave the Environmental Protection Agency the right to regulate tailpipe emissions due to their dangers to public health. The law also gave states like California the right to set their own emissions policies; a move that could force automakers to meet several different standards in the U.S. alone. That led the federal government to essentially adopt California's standard, resulting in a mandate of 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016.

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The Clean Air Act of 2007 gave the Environmental Protection Agency the right to regulate tailpipe emissions due to their dangers to public health. The law also gave states like California the right to set their own emissions policies; a move that could force automakers to meet several different standards in the U.S. alone. That led the federal government to essentially adopt California's standard, resulting in a mandate of 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016.

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What is it with companies thinking they can get around the Clean Air Act? Earlier this year, the second-largest refinery in the U.S. was fined $5.3 million (and required to upgrade pollution control systems for $700 million) for CAA violations. Before that, companies like Pep Boys, Cummins and Mercedes (among others) were all forced to pay fines for selling products that are just plain dirtier than they should be.

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While not the most flashy of lawsuits, the battle over letting E15 (a fuel made up of 15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline) into the national fuel supply just got a lot bigger today. That's because the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers – the trade association that represents 12 major automakers – joined the suit, which was originally brought by the Association of International Automobile Manufacturers, the National Marine Manufacturers Association, and the Outdoor Power E

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Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency approved the use of E15, a 15-percent ethanol and 85-percent gasoline blend, in vehicles from model year 2007 and newer. Now, nine food and farm groups, along with the American Petroleum Institute, are suing the EPA over this decision. According to the two lawsuits filed, the use of E15 in cars, SUVs and light trucks violates the Clean Air Act. API's Bob Greco says testing on the safety of E15 being conducted by Department of Energy and auto

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Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency approved the use of E15, a 15-percent ethanol and 85-percent gasoline blend, in vehicles from model year 2007 and newer. Now, nine food and farm groups, along with the American Petroleum Institute, are suing the EPA over this decision. According to the two lawsuits filed, the use of E15 in cars, SUVs and light trucks violates the Clean Air Act. API's Bob Greco says testing on the safety of E15 being conducted by Department of Energy and automakers

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