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Blue Oval Had Already Revised Hybrid MPG Ratings Downward

New York judge declines to throw the mpg-spurred case out.


Californian Uber drivers may have won class action status in a lawsuit, but Uber isn't about to let this decision go without a fight


Three drivers in California are taking Uber to court over possible violations of labor laws. A federal judge has turned it into a class action suit.


The class-action lawsuit over battery packs in 2011 and 2012 Nissan Leaf EVs in hot climates has been settled. The gist: new, not replacement, batteries.


A group of more than 500 body shops in 36 states have filed a lawsuit against the nation's top insurers over a practice called "steering", which is when insurers use various tactics to lead a policyholder to one of the company's preferred repair shops after an accident. The insurance industry says it doesn't happen, a CNN investigation and at least two attorneys general say otherwise.


Attorneys are continuing to fight to prove that the recalls from General Motors this year allegedly affect vehicle resale values. A $10 billion lawsuit, which is hoping to obtain class-action status, could cover as many as 27 million vehicles and consolidates hundreds of smaller claims. This latest case appears to be related to the one from June in California but is now in a New York court. Both are brought by the law firm Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP.


Elderly And Foreign Visitors Especially Targeted, According To Lawsuit

In retrospect, Eileen McMonigal believes she looked like the perfect target for a scam. She had recently fractured an ankle, so when her flight arrived in Tampa, Florida, she needed a wheelchair to get around the airport. A young escort helped collect her belongings, which included carryon luggage and a puppy in a travel carrier.


Oh, lawyers. Don't ever change. That Washington State firm that filed a "potentially precedent-setting" lawsuit against General Motors has just had a few of its primary arguments shot full of holes in a new story from TheDetroitBureau.com.


General Motors has one more recall-related lawsuit to add to its growing stack, but this time it isn't about the company's ignition switch fiasco. The latest case claims owners lost value on vehicles dating back to 2009, including those that the automaker never recalled. The law firm filing the suit thinks it could affect over 15 million vehicles in the US and be worth over $10 billion.


The 2003 Ford F-Series Super Duty (shown above) introduced the 6.0-liter Power Stroke diesel supplied by Navistar, and while that is an engine Ford would love to forget, it's now one step closer to putting that particular problem behind it. Automotive News is reporting that Ford has settled a class-action lawsuit brought on by problems with this engine that started right out of the gate and ultimately broke up the 30-year relationship between Ford and Navistar.


Investors have had enough of Ecotality, Inc., and are taking legal action. The Rosen Law Firm, PA, has filed a lawsuit on behalf of Ecotality stockholders in New York and the Law Offices of Howard G. Smith, based in Bensalem, PA, is investigating potential claims on behalf of purchasers of Ecotality's securities. Both law firms are basing their claims on potential violations of federal securities laws between April 16, 2013 and August 9, 2013.


BMW has agreed to settle a number of class-action lawsuits out of court. The suits stem from drivetrain issues on the 2001 to 2006 R50 Mini Cooper – in particular, its continuously variable transmission. The transmission was known to fail, often without warning on otherwise healthy and well-maintained vehicles. This wasn't the only major issue to afflict the original BMW-era Mini models.


Ford is waiting to see if it will be facing several class action lawsuits over its mileage ratings - three of which were filed in late April. Suits filed in federal courthouses in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and California claim Ford is overstating the average mileage ratings for its 2013 Ford C-Max and Fusion Hybrids.


A total of 22.6 million current and former Toyota owners have been sent notices that they may be eligible to receive compensation from the automaker for damages related to the unintended acceleration fiasco that has dominated headlines in 2009 and 2010. The total payout may be as high as $1.63 billion, according to The Detroit News.


There has been a lot of fallout from the overstated fuel economy figures that both Hyundai and Kia have admitted to. The two companies are handing out lots of cash to affected customers in the form of debit cards, and the EPA might change the way it works with automakers on fuel economy labels. Some Hyundai/Kia buyers, though, wanted more than an apology and a reimbursement, and thus they filed a number of class-action lawsuits. Thirty-eight, in fact, which were all combined into one big case at


Hell hath no fury like a mobile-phone owner scorned.


From the "I'm in the wrong line of work" department, we find this:


A group of Florida plaintiffs have come together to file a class action lawsuit against Mini. Their issue is with the reliability of the Continuously Variable Transmissions in first-generation Cooper hatchbacks from 2002-2006 and in Cooper Convertible models from 2006-2008. A cursory web search on the matter returns plenty of results from Mini owners complaining of the same issue, sudden failure of the CVT, and having mixed fortunes at Mini dealers when trying to get the situation resolved.


A class-action lawsuit between American Honda Motor Co. and plaintiffs who claimed the Japanese automaker overstated fuel-economy figures on Honda Civic Hybrids has been approved by a San Diego Superior Court Judge.


The deadline for five states to respond to a settlement stemming from a class-action lawsuit from Honda Civic Hybrid owners was extended by a San Diego County superior court judge, the Los Angeles Times reported.

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