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66Why narrower 10-foot roads may be safer than 12-foot roads

We live in a society where more is generally considered better. We want improved fuel economy from our cars, more data from our phones and a better picture from TVs. But when it comes to engineering some roads, giving drivers more room might not actually be an advantage. There's some evidence that switching from the current 12-foot standard for lanes to 10-foot-wide lanes for urban streets could boost safety. The change might potentially mean around 900 fewer fatal crashes each year.

11Seattle Ranked Safest City In America For Pedestrians

More than 108,000 Seattleites safely commute on foot or by public transportation each day

A recent study by Liberty Mutual Insurance found Seattle to be the safest city in America for pedestrians. The Emerald City has 108,000 residents traveling by foot or bike everyday, and less than ten pedestrian deaths each year. While a crunchy west coast city topping the list isn't overly shocking, the rest of the safest cities may surprise you.

2Which American Cities Have The Best And Worst Accident Rates?

Motorists in worst U.S. city average one crash every 4.3 years

Allstate Insurance released its 10th annual America's Best Drivers report this week. In reviewing millions of claims and taking into account factors like city density, population and even weather, researchers came up with a comprehensive list of cities with the best and worst drivers in America.

156Is America's 'motorization' past its peak?

New York topped the list at 56.5% of families without cars.

5Audi forecasts a kinder, gentler, more collaborative urban future

Turns out, the good folks at Audi aren't nihilists. The German automaker has joined up with Columbia University researchers to make predictions about city life in 2050, when 7 billion people will be urban dwellers. The result is five potential future scenarios, and none of them involve world destruction. Or even replicants.

9Think ranks EV-ready cities in the U.S., puts LA, San Francisco at top

Which U.S. city is most ready for an armada of electric vehicles? Los Angeles. Where's the next-best place? San Francisco. Following these two California cities in EV friendliness are a pair of northern cities you might not associate with EVs: Chicago and New York. What makes a city EV ready, as defined by Think? It's not just the number of charging stations per capita. In a statement, Think said:

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