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Formula One racing comes and goes from the United States, meandering as it has between locations like Austin, Indianapolis, Phoenix and Watkins Glen. But the one stalwart of grand prix racing on this continent has been the Canadian Grand Prix. Held with only three exceptions (in 1975, 1987 and 2009) since 1961, North American racing fans can (almost) always count on the Canadian Grand Prix to provide them with their F1 action. And that's not about to change any time soon.


Phinergy and Alcoa show off a modified Citroen C1 with two battery types

If the groups behind it are to be believed, this little electric vehicle could travel 1,000 miles on a single charge. Battery developer Phinergy and metal manufacturer Alcoa have teamed up to demonstrate their aluminum-air battery in a small electric vehicle at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, and our friends at Autoblog Québec were there to check it out.


The motorsports community lost a member over the weekend when a track worker was killed just after the checkered flag waved at Formula One's Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal. When the race ended, track officials were working to remove the crashed racecar of Formula 1 driver Esteban Gutierrez (shown above) when a mobile crane lifting the car ran over the unidentified 38-year-old volunteer in a freak accident.


Formula One comes and goes when it comes to racing North America. While new grands prix are slated for Texas and New Jersey, the Canadian Grand Prix has – with few exceptions – been a steady event on the F1 calendar.


Unlike his pre-BAR Honda F1 days, Jacques Villeneuve's NASCAR career has been strewn with potholes – and by "potholes" we mean crashes, mechanical failures and lowly finishes. But there have been a few successes, with third-place finishes at Montreal in 2010 and at Road America in 2011 – both road courses – and pole position at Montreal last year in the Nationwide Series.


2010 Canadian Grand Prix – Click above for high-res image gallery


Since the Canadian Grand Prix was canceled for this season, Formula One has been entirely absent from North America. But participating automakers, investors and organizers alike know that the North American market is vital and can't be overlooked, and to that end several new developments are said to be underway to bring F1 back over to the western shores of the Atlantic.

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