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Stop us if you've heard this one before: "The Chinese are coming." According to Automotive News, Great Wall Motor Co. plans to sell its vehicles in the US by around 2015. The Chinese automaker has been researching its planned expansion for the last two years, looking at everything from regulatory hurdles to establishing a dealer network, as well as customer needs and wants.


It may be a spell before Chinese automakers are capable of turning out a globally competitive vehicle. That's the findings of a sprawling 200 page report by Bernstein Research. The group went through the trouble of purchasing two Chinese-made cars, importing them to Europe and disassembling them down to every last nut and bolt. The study also included in-depth interviews with CEOs at each of the major manufacturers, including Great Wall, Chery, Brilliance and SAIC among others. Researchers found


There will be plenty of debuts at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, but one of the more unique reveals will be for an entire car company. Chinese automaker Qoros will use the prominent auto show to introduce itself to the world by launching a new production-intent sedan as well as two "concepts" that appear to be production ready. Qoros was founded as a part of a joint venture between Chery Automobile and global holding company, Israel Corporation.


The door has not yet closed on Saab. Hoping for yet another 11th hour stay of execution, the defunct carmaker's chief union, IF Metall, has written directly to President Obama, asking him to intervene, according to Just-Auto. While on the surface, this may seem silly, it's actually rather clever, even if it has little likelihood of working.


We've heard for years that Chinese automakers hoped one day to export their wares to the United States. Ironically, the global economic slowdown could be what gives the Chinese incentive to finally make it happen.


Saab may have finally been saved last week when Chinese companies Pang Da Automobile Trade Co. and Zhejiang Youngman Lotus Automobile Co. agreed to buy the Swedish automaker, thus providing some much-needed short- and long-term financing. Pang Da and Youngman purchased Saab for 100 million euros ($142M USD) and they are offering up a €50 million ($70M) bridge loan. Most importantly, the Chinese companies have now pledged €600 million ($854M) in long-term funding. That's assuming, of co


If you want to do business in the Chinese market, you have to play by the rules set out by the Chinese government... and those rules are subject to change. Such is the case in the automotive segment, where officials from China are reportedly set to add some requirements for automakers that wish to update any contracts in an effort to build more vehicles in China.


Currently, there are 130 different automakers existing in China, and in an effort to create stronger companies, the Chinese government will be releasing plans to encourage mergers and buyouts between the different manufacturers. These new guidelines, drawn up by the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, is said to prohibit automakers from building new plants unless they acquire another existing manufacturer first.


Ford has been trying to offload the Volvo brand since December of 2008, but after years of rumors and speculation those 10 months feel more like a decade. China's Geely has been speculated as the number-one bidder for the Blue Oval's Swedish luxury brand, but a report by Bloomberg asserts that the long-awaited accord could be shelved due to concerns over Ford's intellectual property.


In 2004, China set up an official government body to regulate the business of automobile recalls. Previous to that, some car companies simply wouldn't recall faulty vehicles due to the lack of regulation. The head of that official body recently announced that in the four years it has been tracking recalls, there have been 1.84 million vehicles that needed a little more work done.


China, just like the U.S. of A., is worried about its auto industry. Last year Chinese auto production topped 8.8 million vehicles, and this year the country was on track to reach 10 million sales. Then everything went all pear-shaped, and now Chinese automakers are asking their government for help. Beijing hasn't said exactly what it will do yet, but one plan is to offer incentives for folks to scrap the cars they own and go buy new ones.


One of the main concerns that Autoblog readers have about Chinese cars is their safety. We've seen some fairly horrific crash tests of Chinese-made cars recently, but some improvements, as well. You just gotta know American insurance companies are not looking forward to these things being on U.S. roads.


We remember back in 2005 2006 when the first Chinese automaker to exhibit at the Detroit Auto Show made history just by attending. That would be Geely, and though its display was relegated to the front lobby, the motoring press was impressed by its mere presence in the Motor City. Fast Forward to 2008 and the largest ever contingent of Chinese automakers has just been announced as confirmed for this year's Detroit Auto Show. They include Changfeng Motor Group, BYD Auto Co., China America Automot


Not so long ago, the Chinese government was encouraging automotive manufacturers as a way to stimulate the country's economy. Now, however, the National Development and Reform Commission has hit the brakes with new rules dictating how China's burgeoning automotive industry can expand. "Signs of overcapacity have already appeared, and could worsen," read a statement from the commission.


With China's Geely out of the picture for now, it looks like Chang Feng will be the Chinese representative in Detroit next year. Dow Jones reports that Chang Feng will bring four vehicles to NAIAS 2007. Chang Feng is expected to show up with two Liebao (Chinese for Cheetah) branded pickup trucks and two SUVs. Photos and details are scarce, as you might expect from China. The above photo is Chang Feng's Cheetah concept, unveiled at the 2005 Shanghai Auto Show. Currently, Chang Feng produces licen

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