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Here are the facts on the auto bailout

For a discussion centered on foreign policy, President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney spent a lot of time discussing the condition of the U.S. auto industry during Monday night's presidential debate.

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When Cerberus Capital Management owned Chrysler, it put former CEO Bob Nardelli in charge of The Pentastar. When Nardelli left, shortly after Chrysler came out of bankruptcy, he stepped across the corporate drawbridge and into a role at Cerberus, heading its Operations and Advisory Company. Now, Bloomberg reports that he's leaving that role in order to focus on his own investment and consulting firm, XLR-8, although he'll remain a senior advisor to Cerberus CEO Stephen Feinberg. Nardelli will al

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Former Chrysler CEO Bob Nardelli has performed a curt about face on his comments about the Obama Administration's handling of the auto bailout. The Detroit News reports that Nardelli said that he believes the administration made the correct decision for Chrysler in an email to the publication. Nardelli didn't go so far as to deny his earlier statements, but said that he understood why the government chose the path it took in the situation. He continued on to say that Chrysler was very appreciati

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The Detroit News reports that former Chrysler CEO Bob Nardelli believes that the Obama Administration didn't need to hand the automaker to Fiat in order for the company to continue on. Instead, Nardelli says that a private equity firm could have easily taken the reins and steered the company back toward success. As you may recall, Nardelli left Chrysler in 2009 after the private equity firm Cerberus was forced to loosen its grip on the company. We don't need to elaborate on how well that whole e

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Toronto Dominion Bank has officially agreed to acquire Chrysler Financial. Cerberus Capital Management, the current owner of the Pentastar's lending arm, will receive $6.3 billion from TD Bank in the deal. That figure marks a $900 million loss compared to the $7.4 billion that Cerberus paid for Chrysler financial in 2007 as part of the automaker's takeover. Since then, Cerberus has been forced to hand the reins to the federal government as part of the bailout of 2008, and analysts from The Washi

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According to Bloomberg, Chrysler Financial may have a new owner in the near future. Canada's Toronto-Dominion Bank may be set to make a deal with Cerberus Capital Management, which still owns the Pentastar's loan arm despite stepping away from its role as owners of Chrysler's carmaking operations. If the sale goes through, Chrysler Financial is expected to go for between $6 billion and $7 billion, which is what the entity is worth not considering liabilities. If Toronto-Dominion lays down that k

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More than 450 executives from Chrysler's white collar force, going all the way back to Lee Iacocca, have sued Daimler and Cerberus for gutting the value of their collective supplemental pensions to the tune of $100 million. The class action suit took the noted step of not suing Fiat-owned Chrysler, with the lead attorney saying that "Everybody involved in this suit loves that company and like everybody else wants to see it succeed."

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We haven't heard much from Bob Nardelli since he and his Cerberus buddies rode off into the sunset last year in the wake of the Chrysler bankruptcy. Having proved pretty conclusively that he and his team were incapable of running a large automotive enterprise, Nardelli has apparently managed to climb back on the horse to try again at a slightly smaller enterprise, albeit in a different industry.

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Cerberus submitted its plans for Chrysler Financial to the U.S. Treasury, and then in an announcement that came as a surprise to Cerberus itself, the Treasury said that Chrysler Financial would be shutting down by December 31, 2011. The lending arm paid back its $1.5 billion loan from the government's TARP program, but much of its dealer financing and loan operations were replaced by GMAC.

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According to The Wall Street Journal Jim Press, the Chrysler Group LLC Deputy Chief Executive and sole surviving member of pre-bailout/bankruptcy Chrysler will be resigning his post by the end of November. The WSJ quotes three anonymous people close to the plan. When reached for comment, Press only stated, "I don't think anything has been released about management changes." If true, Press's departure will leave Fiat/Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne without any former-Chrysler advisers -- which may

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Now that the crime is over, the verdict issued and the sentencing issued, we can look forward to a few months years of the CSI treatment applied to what really happened at Chrysler. The first exhibit is a New York Times piece with Cerberus co-founder Stephen Feinberg, coming off almost as The Man Would Would Be Iacocca.

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Nerves are frazzled in Stuttgart over the troubles facing Chrysler. Let's not forget that Daimler still has a skin in the Chrysler game, and while everyone natters and frets about whether or not Fiat will prove to be the Savior Of Auburn Hills, execs are also thinking about the worst-case scenario in the halls of Daimler.

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The recent string of government bailouts has placed a 50,000-watt spotlight on executive pay. Executives from Detroit automakers have already cut their pay to show the public and their own workforces that they're sacrificing for the greater good. There hasn't been much focus, however, on finance arm executives, though there likely will be after Automotive News learned that GMAC CEO Alvaro de Molina was paid $11.6 million in 2008. Molina's 2008 windfall comes one year after he pulled in nearly $5

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That Chrysler continues to struggle isn't exactly news. As a whole, the auto industry is tanking and cars just aren't moving off dealer lots. Chrysler initially responded by offering buyouts to its entire workforce, and 25% off all its salaried workers took the company up on the offer. Earlier this week, we learned that the ailing Auburn Hills empire will get cozy with Italian automaker Fiat. What we haven't heard as much about, however, is the health of Chrysler's parent company, Cerberus Capit

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For over a decade, ownership of Chrysler has been bouncing back and forth over the Atlantic like an Airbus jet. Since its founding in 1925, it was independently owned and operated right out of Detroit, then Daimler bought controlling interest in 1998, only to sell it to U.S.-based Cerberus Capital Management. Now Fiat is poised to assume a 35% stake in the company. So the question is, who holds controlling interest? Well in short, nobody does. Daimler holds nearly 20%, Fiat's taking over 35%, le

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GMAC – and ergo General Motors – just got another Christmas present: the Federal Reserve has granted GMAC bank holding status. GMAC has billions of dollars of bonds coming due over the next 12 months, but doesn't have the liquidity to cover the obligations. As of last week, the financing company was in the midst of a bond buyback effort in order to raise enough money to qualify for bank holding status. Now that it's been granted, GMAC can tap the Troubled Asset Relief Fund intended f

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Can this really be happening all over again? Weeks after merger talks between Chrysler and GM seemed to implode, the companies may be talking about hooking up again, according to the Wall Street Journal. General Motors Corp. and Chrysler LLC have reportedly stepped back into the negotiation room after Chrysler owner Cerberus Capital Management LP said that maybe, just maybe, it's willing to give up some ownership in the Pentastar. In fact, it may be that Cerberus has started this latest round of

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GM doesn't just have its eye on auto bailout funds -- its GMAC division (of which it owns 49%) is looking for cash from among the $700 billion pledged in the Wall Street bailout. Through the end of next year, GMAC has roughly $12 billion in bonds maturing. But to have any chance at getting Wall Street funds to address those maturing bonds, GMAC wants to become a bank holding company. And to do that, it must raise $30 billion, with $2 billion of that tapped from new sources.

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Daimler has already admitted that its 19.9% share in Chrysler is worth absolutely zero as far as its corporate balance sheets are concerned, but that's not stopping Cerberus from going after that remaining bit as it tries to become the sole owner of the beleaguered American automaker. Without full control of Chrysler, Cerberus would have a tough time offloading it in either one lump deal or in smaller, bit-by-bit transactions. But it sounds like Chrysler's majority owner isn't making life easy f

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