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130NTSB wants to ban mobile phone and electronics use in cars across the country [UPDATE]

In August of last year, a 19-year-old pickup driver received 11 texts in as many minutes while traveling down a Missouri highway outside Gray Summit. The truck rear-ended a stopped tractor trailer at speed, which was then struck by not one, but two school buses, resulting in a massive, multi-car pileup that left 38 people injured and two dead – including the serial texter and a 15-year-old student riding in one of the buses.

21Chrysler joins Ford, backs hand-held cellphone ban

Chrysler has joined Ford in backing a federal ban on the use of hand-held mobile phones while driving. According to The Detroit News, Chrysler, Ford and Verizon Wireless have all announced their support of the Safe Drivers Act of 2011. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D, NY), would require the Transportation Department to study the impact of distracted driving over two years, especially on younger drivers. After that time, the agency would make a recommendation on minimum federal st

57Ford first to support bill banning handheld phones while driving

We're on the verge of having a nationwide ban on using handheld cell phones while driving, and Ford is the first automaker to stand behind the cause. According to The Detroit Free Press, Ford's vice president of government affairs, Pete Lawson, said that this "represents a practical, commonsense approach to a national problem."

42Report: LaHood pushes for total phone ban among truck and bus drivers

The U.S. Department of Transportation is looking into a full-on mobile phone ban for commercial drivers while behind the wheel as part of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood's initiative to curb distracted driving. According to Reuters, the move would further impact the four million drivers who are already forbidden from texting while driving.

56Study: Laws banning hand-held phones do not reduce crashes

This one doesn't surprise us one bit and we'll explain why in a moment. Until then, clock this: a Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) study determined that laws banning the use of hand-held phones have no effect on the crash rate. None, as in zero effect. Says HLDI and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety president Adrian Lund, "The laws aren't reducing crashes, even though we know that such laws have reduced hand-held phone use." So there you go, drivers get into an equal number of crashes wit

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