6 Articles
1 / 1
196

An uptick in incidents suggests 2013 may be on track for tragic year

A child dies every nine days in the U.S. after being left too long in a hot car, according to the advocacy group Kids And Cars.

118

Follow these tips and keep children safe on the road

Did you know 3 out of every 4 car seats are used incorrectly? According to safercar.gov, parents haven't been doing enough to keep their kids safe on the road, which has resulted in vehicle crashes becoming one of the leading causes of death for children between 1 and 13 years old.

9

Last week Volvo announced a range of car seats designed with Britax specifically for Volvo cars. The same announcement also stated the seats wouldn't be for sale in the U.S. because NHTSA doesn't allow the sale of car seats only meant for specific cars. In our reader poll of your opinion, more than 80% of you declared the feds universal child seat mandate wrong.

5

French seat manufacturer Faurecia has announced a new seat design that eliminates completely the use of polyurethane foam. The model, called Sustainable Comfort Seat, has two sheets of injection-molded thermoplastic polyurethane instead of classic foam. The new process not only saves weight, it's 17 percent (30 mm or 1 1/4 inches) thinner than standard seats, which gives backseat passengers a bit more legroom. The metallic structure is also replaced by injection-molded nylon and long-glass-fiber

25

The Chicago Tribune is shaking a rattle at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Its investigation has found 31 cases of infant seats exceeding injury limits or disconnecting from their bases during federal vehicle frontal impact crash tests. The NHTSA slams countless cars into barriers each year, like the 2008 Dodge Caravan in the gallery below. In addition to the sensor-laden crash dummies, some of the vehicles are also fitted with infant or child seats. According to the Tribune,

10

Consumer Reports has named two men to head up a review of its controversial child safety seat tests. About a month ago, Consumer Reports withdrew its headline-making analysis of child car safety seats. The tests at first seemed to indicate most seats were not adequate to protect children in side impacts. After criticism that the tests were faulty, the nonprofit group retracted the results.

1 / 1
Share This Post

Carseats Questions

There are no questions about this topic.
Be the first to ask!

From Our Partners

Cars for Sale Near You