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The experiment is more affordable than paying for rides one at a time.

Make sure to read the fine print.

California has nearly 1,300 miles of carpool lanes that are typically reserved for drivers willing to tote a bunch of friends along for the ride. Recently, the state opened carpool lanes to drivers of super-ultra-low-emissions vehicles (SULEV), ultra-low-emissions vehicles (ULEV) and inherently low-emissions vehicles (such as EVs). The access to carpool lanes for these "clean" vehicles was set to expire in 2011, but with a swipe of his hand, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed off o

Carpooling just got easier with the introduction of a new app that makes ride sharing a breeze. The Ride Remedy app, introduced by CorGar, LLC, aims to "save the planet one ride at a time." It's an idea we've heard before: with Zimride, 511 Rideshare and Carticipate.

Whether this graphic makes seeing the commuting pattern of eight major U.S. cities easier to understand or clear as mud might be a personal choice. We happen to think it's quite clever, and you can see the larger version here.

SNCF, the public company that manages the French railway system, has launched a new carpool service. Aimed at people who live in the large Paris metropolitan area and use the commuter train system, Transilien, to go to work, the idea is to get more people to use fewer cars because most stations have insufficient parking space. Since commuting by car to the train station is a problem for many people right now, SNCF hopes that sponsoring a system that promotes carpooling will make parking easier a

Overall, the trend for the upcoming years will be more and more cars, maybe up to 3.5 billion around the world (there are about 800 million on the roads today). Cars like the ultra-cheap Tata Nano are opening the door for more and more people to own their own car, and a lot of people are eager to get their hands on one.

Hitchhiking is a very simple way to share a ride and, sometimes, share gasoline expenses and reduce carbon emissions. In the Netherlands and Belgium there are even some organized hitchhiking centers, where both car drivers and carless people register and meet to share a ride. Well, the same concept has arrived online in various places (see also Zimride and Carticipate), but it's web-based now and it's called Roadsharing. The website works in a very simple way to hitchhikers and drivers in contac

The other day, I wrote a post about Zimride, a new online carpool app that integrates with Facebook to match up riders and drivers. I knew when I wrote that post that I had seen another similar program in the iTunes Application store, but couldn't remember the name at the time. Well, thanks to the people behind that iPhone/iPod Touch app (who are apparently AutoblogGreen readers and wrote in to remind me what I'd seen) I can now confidently say that what I'd seen was called Carticipate.

There is no shortage of online carpooling or rideshare websites -

Photo by Hjem. Licensed under Creative Commons license 2.0.

Pennsylvanians who want to take one of the easiest possible steps to reduce vehicle emissions, congestion and fuel use (I'm talking about carpooling here) are getting a push from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. The PA DEP's is promoting a summer-long "Share the Ride Challenge" that targets Susquehanna Valley commuters. The Challenge starts tomorrow and officially continues through September 30 and asks people to carpool or use public transportation at least ten times in

VAO (Vía de Alta Ocupación) is the Spanish name for HOV lanes. Madrid has been working with a VAO lane on one of the main entries of the city, via the A6 highway (Northwest). This lane is usually used only by public transport, but the Regional Government of Madrid has decided to allow private motorists to enter the lane as long as cars are used by more than one person. In order to promote carpooling, the regional goverment has created a website where motorists can share their rides

Earlier this month, we found out that the city of Mumbai in India was offering some cool perks for those willing to carpool. We thought that this was a pretty cool idea, so we are pretty keen on the thought that the U.S. is getting something similar. So far only available in one state, NuRide and Dunkin' Donuts have teamed up to offer discounts at Dunkin' Donuts locations for those carpoolers-in-Connecticut who'd like to save $5.00 off a "Box 'O Joe" and a dozen donuts.

How are gas prices affecting you personally? If you drive an SUV every day, your fuel bill is surely putting a crimp in your pocketbook. Even if you drive a vehicle which gets high fuel mileage, we imagine that you're still quite cognizant of your driving habits. Do you carpool to work or when dropping your kids off at school? Do you walk or ride your bike to places that you used to drive to? These questions are important, both to your fellow readers and to car manufacturers. To prove that point

Most of us here in the U.S. don't get the opportunity to drive around in the UK very often, and that includes myself. Still, I was a bit shocked when I read the press release I've now posted after the break, which announced that the UK has just opened the country's first High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane. So, they're a little ahead in roundabouts, and we're a little ahead in carpooling.

If you live in the Bay Area and like to conserve resources (like, say, money and oil), perhaps ride sharing should be added to your list of transportation options. A free service called 511 Rideshare can help passengers and drivers find each other for daily commutes. The website can also help you find vanpool information, which is like carpooling on on steroids. Actually, considering the negative association steroids have these days, I'll say it's more like carpooling on a healthy vegan diet: s

We've all been tempted to merge into the car pool lane when driving alone in heavy traffic, but either the shame of other motorists seeing you illegally use it or the thought of the police catching you in the act may have kept you honest. Now there's a way to legally use the lane, but it's going to cost you.

It couldn't be any simpler, and you've already done at least 75% of it somewhere before: 1. You join and post a profile; 2. You join a group; 3. When you're going somewhere, you post the details of your trip; 4. If you need a ride, you search for someone going your way. When you attract or find a match, bingo. You're are now a "GoLo." In the best new medium social networking tradition, it's a public forum, so you don't have to approve just anyone for a ride, and people who give and get rides are

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