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Lamborghini is serious about carbon fiber. More than simply using the material, the Italian sportscar manufacturer has developed new types of it. The question is, what to do with it once it's developed?

BMW has been making some headlines over the past few months with its commitment to carbon fiber construction, opening a joint-venture production facility in Washington State and teasing the upcoming Megacity EV as the first mass-produced carbon fiber vehicle. But there's always a back story to the headlines.

BMW has been making some headlines over the past few months with its commitment to carbon fiber construction, opening a joint-venture production facility in Washington State and teasing the upcoming Megacity EV as the first mass-produced carbon fiber vehicle. But there's always a back story to the headlines.

2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG – Click above for high-res image gallery

Click on the image for more shots of the Future Chair wheelchairs

On the surface, carbon fiber sounds like a wonder-product which can replace much of the heavy metal, especially steel, that makes up the vast majority of nearly every automobile's structure. Dig a bit deeper, however, and there are a few flies in CF's ointment that make it very difficult to use in vehicles: price, supply and the time it takes to mold a the weaved material. Japan's big three carbon fiber producers are tackling each of these issues in a number of ways. First, the price of CF is ex

Tom Cruise is on the top of list to get Ducati's new $72,500 superbike, the Desmosedici RR, which was released this week. The bike uses lightweight but strong titanium, magnesium and tres green carbon fiber. Specifically, the rear seat support is made from high-temperature resin type carbon fibre, only found in racing bikes. The tail also includes a ceramic carbon fibre composite cover, the same technology used in F1 cars.

While some of Nissan's green moves include forays into diesel technology (see these posts on the Titan and the Forum concept), the company is also working on a foolproof way to increase MPGs: reducing weight. According to a story in DowJones, Nissan is working to slash the average weight of its vehicles by 15 percent (compared to 2005 model year numbers) over the next seven years. The cuts will come "by rethinking vehicle design, using light weight materials and encouraging parts suppliers to al

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