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The Citroën SM sat on the first set of production glass fiber and resin wheels in 1972 when parent company Michelin developed the exotic hoops in order to take the SM rallying. It wasn't until 2008 that we got the first all-carbon-fiber wheel for passenger cars in the form of a prototype model from Weds Sports in Japan that remained a prototype. Australian company Carbon Revolution followed that a year later with its CR-9 all-CF wheel, first introduced on the Shelby Ultimate Aero and now av

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General Motors has announced a partnership with a leading carbon fiber producer in an effort to research the possibility of widespread use of the material in its vehicles. Teijin Limited has pioneered a new manufacturing process for carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic that allows for cycle times of under one minute. Typically, creating carbon fiber parts from molds requires the use of slow-setting resin that simply takes too long to be practical for use on a large scale. As part of the tie-up

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Not as easily spotted as its Spyder relative, the Audi Urban Concept Sportback more closely matches the renderings we saw before the start of the Frankfurt Motor Show. That's not to say we were totally prepared for the quirkiness of either version, but at least the Sportback's carbon fiber reinforced plastic body was somewhat known to us.

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Not as easily spotted as its Spyder relative, the Audi Urban Concept Sportback more closely maches the renderings we saw before the start of the Frankfurt Motor Show. That's not to say that we were totally prepared for the quirkiness of either version, but at least the Sportback's carbon fiber reinforced plastic body was somewhat known to us.

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Japan-based Teijin Limited has announced that it has established mass production technologies for carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) that reduces the cycle time for molding automobile frames to less than one minute. In other words, by the time you're done reading this post (or maybe this and another one), Teijin could have made you a lightweight car frame.

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German-based Daimler AG and Japan's Toray Industries have joined forces to manufacture carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) for the automotive industry. Though the name of the joint venture has yet to be determined, Toray's stake will stand at 50.1 percent, Daimler's at 44.9, and other unnamed partners will hold a five-percent share.

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BMW has been making some headlines over the past few months with its commitment to carbon fiber construction, opening a joint-venture production facility in Washington State and teasing the upcoming Megacity EV as the first mass-produced carbon fiber vehicle. But there's always a back story to the headlines.

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BMW has been making some headlines over the past few months with its commitment to carbon fiber construction, opening a joint-venture production facility in Washington State and teasing the upcoming Megacity EV as the first mass-produced carbon fiber vehicle. But there's always a back story to the headlines.

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2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG – Click above for high-res image gallery

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2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG – Click above for high-res image gallery

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Carbon fiber has been a big success in the automotive aftermarket for years now. From interior trim pieces to strut bars on down to spoilers, the material is extremely popular and for many reasons. First, it's lightweight yet very strong. Second, it just plain looks good. And finally, it begs for attention from other car enthusiasts. While the aftermarket has been hot for this stuff for some time now, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have not exactly warmed up to widespread use of the spa

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BMW has just announced that the company will join forces with Seattle-based SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers LLC to build a new manufacturing facility in Moses Lake, Washington. Don't get too excited just yet. The plant won't be cranking out CF bits for your 3 Series so that you can have a roof that looks like the one on your neighbor's M3 (shown above). Instead, BMW says the $100 million facility will be creating carbon-fiber reinforced plastics for the upcoming Megacity vehicle. At the same time,

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Before BMW gives Americans the chance to drive ultimate urban commuter machines in the shape of its upcoming sub-branded Megacity EV, it will be giving them something else in high demand: jobs. The carbon-fiber that will be used to lightweight the vehicles will be made at a plant in Washington state by SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, a joint venture between BMW and SGL Group. The location was chosen, BMW says, because of its skilled workforce, the availability of clean, low-cost hydropower and oth

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