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AddFeds Probe Possible Delay In Graco Recall Of 6.1 Million Child Seats

NHTSA to investigate largest such recall in history

The federal agency charged with keeping motorists safe on US roads is investigating whether child car-seat manufacturer Graco delayed in recalling millions of defective car seats.

AddFeds probe possible delay in Graco recall of 6.1M child seats [w/video]

NHTSA To Investigate Largest Such Recall In History

Collectively, the 6.1 million seats comprise the largest recall of children's car seats in U.S. history.

1Feds probe possible delay in Graco children's car seat recall

NHTSA opens timeliness query into company's handling of defective latches

The federal agency charged with keeping motorists safe on U.S. roads is investigating whether child car-seat manufacturer Graco delayed in recalling millions of defective car seats.

1Graco Recalls Another 1.9 Million Car Seats

The move makes it the largest recall of its kind in history

After months of disputing a safety problem even existed, Graco has agreed to recall 1.9 million children's car seats affected by defective buckles.

36How IndyCar technology wound up in your kid's car seat [w/video]

This Built America: Dorel Juvenile Group

"What I'm assembling is potentially going to save someone's life. You can't just go anywhere to get that." – Mark Evanko

5Evenflo recalls 1.37 million car seats for issue with harness buckle

One month ago, it was Graco car seats that were in our headlines, following a 4.2-million-unit recall over reports of parents having to cut their children out of the seats after the buckles seized. Now, Graco's competitor, Evenflo, is in the hot seat (no pun intended).

1Graco Recalls 400,000 Additional Car Seats, 1.8 Million More Still Disputed

NHTSA wants more seats fixed; defect may have led to at least 1 death

Graco is recalling 403,222 more car seats over a potentially deadly problem with their buckles.

196Kids Are Still Dying After Being Left In Hot Cars

An uptick in incidents suggests 2013 may be on track for tragic year

A child dies every nine days in the U.S. after being left too long in a hot car, according to the advocacy group Kids And Cars.

118Playing It Safe With Kids And Cars

Follow these tips and keep children safe on the road

Did you know 3 out of every 4 car seats are used incorrectly? According to safercar.gov, parents haven't been doing enough to keep their kids safe on the road, which has resulted in vehicle crashes becoming one of the leading causes of death for children between 1 and 13 years old.

58IIHS says most LATCH systems are too difficult to use [w/video]

If you've ever tried installing an infant car seat in say, a Jaguar XKR, you understand that just because a car has LATCH anchors doesn't mean your car seat is going to fit. Those anchors are supposed to make child restraint installation a breeze, but according to a new study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, many automakers aren't following the spirit of the law requiring them.

5Record number of booster seats earn highest rating from IIHS

Ah, booster seats, the last removable throne before children earn the privilege of sitting their butts directly on a car's seat, which they'll then refuse to do until the day they turn 16 and start driving themselves. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety began testing booster seats back in 2008, and this year's lot has produced a record number of BEST BETS designations, the highest rating the IIHS bestows upon a booster seat.

85Toxic chemicals found in over half of children's car seats

Car seats are undoubtedly a must-have if you want to keep your child safe in the car. Yet, as with so many other things, they can hide surprises that you might want your child to avoid. In this case the surprise is chemicals that, according to HealthyStuff.org, possess "known toxicity, persistence, and tendency to build up in people and the environment." They include bromine, chlorine and lead, among others.

17How government safety standards for car seats fail large children

Every parent does his or her best to keep their children safe. Car seats are a big part of that equation, and snapping our little cherubs into a five-point harness makes us feel like we've done our very best to care for our precious offspring. But are we really?

9Followup: NHTSA to allow vehicle-specific child seats after all?

Last week Volvo announced a range of car seats designed with Britax specifically for Volvo cars. The same announcement also stated the seats wouldn't be for sale in the U.S. because NHTSA doesn't allow the sale of car seats only meant for specific cars. In our reader poll of your opinion, more than 80% of you declared the feds universal child seat mandate wrong.

AddThe future of your car seat is foamless

French seat manufacturer Faurecia has announced a new seat design that eliminates completely the use of polyurethane foam. The model, called Sustainable Comfort Seat, has two sheets of injection-molded thermoplastic polyurethane instead of classic foam. The new process not only saves weight, it's 17 percent (30 mm or 1 1/4 inches) thinner than standard seats, which gives backseat passengers a bit more legroom. The metallic structure is also replaced by injection-molded nylon and long-glass-fiber

25NHTSA in hot seat after troubling baby car seat tests found

The Chicago Tribune is shaking a rattle at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Its investigation has found 31 cases of infant seats exceeding injury limits or disconnecting from their bases during federal vehicle frontal impact crash tests. The NHTSA slams countless cars into barriers each year, like the 2008 Dodge Caravan in the gallery below. In addition to the sensor-laden crash dummies, some of the vehicles are also fitted with infant or child seats. According to the Tribune,

10Consumer Reports names pair to review child seat tests

Consumer Reports has named two men to head up a review of its controversial child safety seat tests. About a month ago, Consumer Reports withdrew its headline-making analysis of child car safety seats. The tests at first seemed to indicate most seats were not adequate to protect children in side impacts. After criticism that the tests were faulty, the nonprofit group retracted the results.

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