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Ever wonder where automakers get the names for their cars? You're not alone. The sitcom Seinfeld opened Episode 94 – the one where George Costanza buys a Chrysler LeBaron instead of a Volvo – with a bit about nameplates like Integra, Supra and Impreza. Toyota, clearly, is not exempt from choosing evocative but enigmatic names for its models, and now the Japanese automaker is taking us through the etymology of some of its nameplates.


Why did Toyoda name his company "Toyota?" What does "Audi" mean? What the heck is a Camaro? You might know the answers to some of these questions, and you might not. But even if you do, you'll want to take a look at this video from Mental Floss.


We all know someone who's named their car. And chances are – let's face it – that person is probably a girl. We're not being sexist here: we're just looking at the numbers presented by a new study from DMEautomotive.


This Russian two year old is sharp as a tack when it comes to knowing her car brands. Over the course of this video, she names nearly every brand she passes; impressive when there are plenty of adults who don't know an Audi from a Nissan. Another thing that's clear from the video, Mazda, BMW (all in a row!) and Hyundai are pretty popular brands in this little automotive whiz-kid's neighborhood.


In the relatively lengthy press release that Kia composed for the launch of its Provo concept car at the Geneva Motor Show this week, the company never mentioned where the name came from, or what it means for the car. A very basic web search for "Provo" reveals that the inspiration for the hatch could have been a city in Utah, a township in South Dakota or a village in Bosnia. The name could be a reference to either an American (Fred) or Canadian (Dwayne) football player, and Provo might also ac


A new study commissioned by British parking lot operator NCP has found that nearly half of all UK drivers name their vehicles. Researchers questioned a total of 3,000 UK drivers ranging in age from 17 to 45 to determine whether or not they have a special moniker for their vehicle. The study also took the time to look into which names drivers chose.


2008 Ford Kuga in front, possible 2011 Ford Kuga out back – click above for high-res image gallery


Will a Lincoln by any other name sell as sweetly?

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