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Feds Seek Assistance From Some Experts, Ignore Help From Other Ones

Cars have become hacking targets, but documents show the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is struggling to address automotive cyber threats.


Like The EPA, DOT Officials Chill Hope For Protections In Copyright Law

Independent researchers have uncovered major cyber-security weaknesses and emissions scams, but the government agencies that benefit most don't appreciate the help.


Charlie Miller And Chris Valasek Head To Ride-Sharing Giant

Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller, the security researchers behind some of the most prominent car-hacking studies to date, are taking on their next automotive challenge.


Researchers Manipulated Brakes From A Smartphone

In the latest car-hacking exploit in a summer full of them, researchers from the University of California-San Diego say they've found a way to manipulate braking in a 2013 Chevrolet Corvette. The vulnerabilities may not be limited to that car.


Information Security Conference Underway In Las Vegas

The annual Black Hat conference is underway in Las Vegas, where an extra emphasis will be placed on automotive security.


Instead Of Fighting Hackers, They're Fighting The Messengers

More than anyone, Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller are responsible for alerting Americans to the hacking perils awaiting them in their modern-day cars.


Multiple high-profile car hacks this year suggest that vehicles aren't entirely secure from software vulnerabilities. Experts say that future problems are inevitable.


NHTSA Official: Breach Is "First Example Of What's To Come"

A cyber-security gap that allowed for the remote hacking of a Jeep Cherokee has federal officials concerned.


Senators Blumenthal And Markey Introduce Bill To Mandate Federal Standards

Hours after two prominent cyber-security researchers announced they had discovered a flaw that allowed them to remotely take control of a Jeep Cherokee, two members of Congress introduced legislation Tuesday to address the growing threat posed by car hackers.


OEMs Raise Concerns About Independent Researchers With Congress

Arguments over whether cyber-security researchers should have the right to experiment on cars may not end when the U.S. Copyright Office issues a key ruling expected later this month.


NHTSA And OEMs Have Two Weeks To Provide Answers

Congress wants to know more about how federal regulators and major car manufacturers plan to protect drivers from automotive cyber attacks.


Ahead of autonomous vehicles, lightweighting, and hydrogen fuel cells, the MIT Technology Review puts vehicle-to-vehicle communications on its list of Ten Breakthrough Technologies of 2015. But with car hacking making more headlines more frequently, will V2V be just another way to for your car to be remotely commandeered?


Concerns Grow Over Auto Industry's Cyber-Security Blind Spots

Cyber threats have emerged as a big concern for automakers, as researchers have exposed serious holes in vehicle security that could allow hackers to commandeer cars. Those worries might be small compared to what's ahead.


One Student's Exploits Showed Executives How Vulnerable Their Cars Are

A 14-year-old boy may have forever changed the way the auto industry views cyber security.


Former Defense Department Official: Stricter Safeguards Needed

A teenage computer whiz hacked into software that controlled traffic lights in a southwestern US city. Once inside the program, the 16-year-old boy accessed systems that could wreak havoc. An investigator said the boy could have turned all the lights to a blinking-red default that would snarl traffic. Or worse, turned them all green.


Critics say new measures don't go far enough in securing information

In a letter to the Federal Trade Commission, the 12 manufacturers that are members of the Auto Alliance committed to upholding principles that would provide more transparent notices to consumers about what data is being collected, minimize the amount and time of data that is stored and prohibit this information from being given to law enforcement without a court order.


"You can have everything super-secure, but one part can compromise everything in the car, including safety." – Walter Buga


A pair of cyber security experts have awarded the ignominious title of most hackable vehicles on American roads to the 2014 Jeep Cherokee, 2014 Infiniti Q50 and 2015 Cadillac Escalade.


New cars with complex networks easiest to hack

When buying a car, consumers look for crash ratings and the amount of airbags, but they're missing information about one critical key safety feature; the security of the car's computer network.


A car is no longer a car. It's a computer with wheels and an engine.


Hackers will need to gain access to the car's 17-inch touchscreen display

In the world of computers, competitions that challenge so-called "white hat" hackers are fairly common. Break into this system in X minutes and we'll give you Y dollars. Rarely, though, does this world cross over with the realm of automobiles.

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