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46Ferrari to offer right of first refusal to elite cadre of customers

When an automaker like Ferrari comes out with a limited edition model, the entire run usually spoken for before we ever see a single photo or detail. Which is fine for the automaker in question, but can often irk many of its best customers, who would gladly shell out whatever the asking price for the opportunity to own the rarest of Prancing Horses.

AddMembership in car clubs almost doubles in one year in UK

For people who don't need a car of their own but would like to have access to a ride now and again, car clubs (aka car sharing programs) can be a perfect solution. To join one of these car clubs, you typically pay a membership fee in addition to per use charges. Members reserve cars ahead of time and some clubs even offer up some pretty exotic rides.

15P1 reportedly following other British supercar clubs into bankruptcy

While the idea of the supercar club has yet to take hold here in The Colonies, across the Atlantic in jolly old England, the notion developed into a popular alternative to the costly prospect of owning and maintaining high-priced exotica. The idea, in a nutshell, was to provide customers with the opportunity to occasionally borrow vehicles from a stable of supercars. Since most privately-owned supercars sit around unused most of the time, membership in a supercar club seemed – and, for a w

48It was bound to happen: K Car Club springs up

Unloved as they are, let's give Chrysler's K Car its due. Thirty years ago, the K represented a sea change in the Pentastar lineup. Not only did the K and its derivatives return Chrysler to the black, the architecture proved versatile enough to underpin basically the entire lineup, from minivans to LeBarons to turbocharged Daytonas. Southern California now has an official K Car club – fitting, as that's likely the only place you could find an early '80s Chrysler without lots of rust. Club

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