7 Articles
1 / 1
14

The average cost for Detroit's Big Three automakers to meet the proposed fuel efficiency targets of 31.6 miles per gallon by 2015 has been pegged at $30.6 billion. In contrast, the average cost for the Japanese automakers sits at less than half that amount at "only" $14.85 billion. These numbers come courtesy of a recent study by Global Insight. In a real shocker, General Motors alone is expected to pay out $15 billion alone. Why the disparity? Simple: the Japanese brands already offer more fuel

11

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) has been involved with the ins and outs of the CAFE standards for a long while. This week, following the NHTSA's call for a 31.6 mpg average (35.7 for cars and 28.6 for light trucks) by 2015, Pelosi had some kind word for the President and the NHTSA. So, first the automakers say they're OK with these stricter numbers and now Pelosi lauds Bush? What's going on here? You can try to figure it out for yourself by reading Pelosi's statement in full after the jum

19

We all know that the Democratic Representative from the Automakers Michigan, John Dingell, is a foe of state-based regulations over the auto industry. Back in February, he tried to revive an excised portion of the energy bill that would have made federal CO2 limits take precedence over state rules. In an editorial in Automotive News (subs req'd), Edward Lapham writes that it's Dingell who will be of very few lawmakers who "get" why America needs a national fuel economy law instead of allowing st

6

Now that everyone has had a few days to digest the impact of the new Energy Bill that was signed by President Bush on Wednesday, what do they think? Here's a cheat sheet:

7

Not that there was any real question, but the 35 mpg CAFE deed is now done. President Bush signed the huge new energy bill into law this morning, and that means that automakers will need to have the average fleet economy of new vehicles reach 35 mpg by 2020. We don't need rehash the history of this repeatedly-weakened bill once again (see previous posts here and here if you need a recap); let's just be thankful that the 35 mpg standard survived all the backing down. And the Detroit News mention

5

U.S. military veterans' groups are getting involved in the Congressional mileage debate. The AP reports that about three dozen veterans from the group New Hampshire for Peace wrote a letter to Congress this week calling for the 35 mpg level in the CAFE standards to remain in the final bill. The reasons are pretty self-explanatory, if you see the broader picture. For example, the veterans say that the 35 mpg level would reduce imports by 1.2 million barrels of oil which is, as the letter says, "m

Add

Forget MPG, just pull into a gas station with your Tesla Roadster and smile....

1 / 1
Share This Post

Cafe Mpg Questions

There are no questions about this topic.
Be the first to ask!

From Our Partners

Cars for Sale Near You