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4Bristol teases new car, will debut in 2015

Bristol Cars is one of those boutique British brands that is well beyond its heyday in the '50s and '60s; see also Peerless or Sunbeam. But what makes Bristol different is that it's still around today. Despite some financial hiccups in 2011, the company is showing that British stiff upper lip and claims that it has two new models on the way in the coming years.

22Bristol hybrid supercar waiting in the wings

The denouement is happening in geologic time, but it looks like historic British carmaker Bristol will be resurrected with a hybrid supercar courtesy of another historic former British carmaker, Frazer-Nash. Four years ago, Frazer-Nash, now a Swiss company specializing in hybrid and alternative drivetrains, showed off the Namir concept designed by Guigiaro. After Bristol went bankrupt in 2011 it was bought by Kamkorp Autokraft, the parent company of Frazer-Nash with plans to make a hybrid superc

AddEcotricity links up UK service stations with chargers along Electric Highway

Electric vehicles can now drive between Bristol, Birmingham and London without fear of running out of juice since Ecotricity opened two additional charging stations along the UK's Electric Highway as part of the world's first nationwide charging network.

15Bristol working on 200-mph electric supercar?

Bristol has been in the news lately due to due a serious 'down' (bankruptcy) and a last-minute 'up' (saved by Frazer-Nash). Now, the British automaker is once again making headlines, and this time, it's because of a decidedly ambitious plan. Britain's Evo magazine has gotten wind of the company's plan to create a supercar that boasts a twofold method of attack. First, it will hit 200 miles per hour and second, it will achieve 100 miles per gallon.

AddBristol working on 200-mph electric supercar?

Bristol has been in the news lately due to due a serious 'down' (bankruptcy) and a last-minute 'up' (saved by Frazer-Nash). Now, the British automaker is once again making headlines, and this time, it's because of a decidedly ambitious plan. Britain's Evo magazine has gotten wind of the company's plan to create a supercar that boasts a twofold method of attack. First, it will hit 200 miles per hour and second, it will achieve 100 miles per gallon.

8Bristol Cars saved by... Frazer-Nash?!

Ill-fated Bristol Cars has reportedly been rescued from the perils of administration by an unlikely savior. Kamkorp Autokraft, a Swiss company that's part of the Frazer-Nash empire, officially bought the British automaker after it was forced to make 22 members of its 25 person staff redundant last month. According to PistonHeads, Kamkorp Autokraft says it intends to blend the Bristol Cars tradition of building beautiful vehicles with the alternative-energy knowledge amassed by Frazer-Nash. The n

17Report: Bristol Cars slides into administration

Ultra-exclusive luxury sports car manufacturer Bristol has gone into administration after running into financial trouble. According to the BBC, Tom MacLennan and Trevor Binyon of RSM Tenon have been named joint administrators of the storied English marque, which has been peddling its cars through a single showroom in London since 1946.

79Time: NASCAR struggles to get its groove back

Bristol Speedway is among the most well-known tracks in America, and an all-time favorite of NASCAR fans. In fact, the track sold out 55 straight times beginning in 1982. But that streak came to an end in March, and the NASCAR news only gets more depressing from there. According to Time, NASCAR has seen its television audiences drop by a knee-wobbling 25 percent since 2005, and last year alone, attendance was down 10 percent.

42The real reason for traffic jams: us!

Finally, there's an explanation for those wasted hours we spent on the MassPike today asking no one in particular "what the (dirty word) is this (dirty word)?" A team of mathemeticians from the Universities of Exeter, Bristol and Budapest developed a mathematical model revealing that traffic jams are caused by idiots. Okay, not exactly. The real explanation is that unexpected events, such as being cut off, require slowing below a threshold speed for smooth traffic flow. As we've all observed, wh

17Bristol break-in stops the presses

Bristol, a little known British builder of expensive luxury and sports cars, opened up its shop this past Monday in Patchway, England to find a rude surprise. Thieves had broken into the factory over the weekend and, instead of stealing cars, ripped off the company's presses that stamp out body panels for its pricey lineup. Ten presses in all were boosted that make body panels for the Blenheim range of coupes. Fortunately, since Bristol only manages to produce about 2 or 3 cars a week, its curre

12Man's Bristol 411 towed and crushed, even though it's legally parked

When you live in a city as densely populated as Lambeth, South London, you have to follow parking laws very closely, or your vehicle will be towed. Mendoza Stewart abided by the law, and it didn't matter anyway. Stewart's ultra-rare 1972 Bristol 411 was towed away by the Lambeth Council, even though the car was legally parked. When Stewart returned to the scene of his last parking job, he was "horrified" to see that his vehicle had vanished. Stewart naturally called the police, only to find that

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