4 Articles
1 / 1
22

GM and Chrysler have until Tuesday to complete the financial restructuring demanded by the government under the terms of the bridge loans. It is unlikely that they will make that target. The sticking point for GM is unwillingness on the part of bondholders to agree to what's being asked: GM needs to transform $27 billion of debt into liquidity, and that means a serious dilution of bondholder equity.

48

To be fair, the new president faces a lot of immediate challenges. But when it comes to the auto industry, the biggest four challenges could be the bridge loans, fuel economy mandates, the EPA vs The California 14, and the board of czars that will oversee the fortunes of GM and Chrysler. The similarity between these challenges and others on the domestic and global agenda: he doesn't have a lot of time to get them right.

10

On Monday, December 29, Chrysler and General Motors were supposed to get the first installments of its allotted funds from the $17.4 billion dollar bridge loans. On Wednesday, GM got it's $4 billion. Chrysler, on the other hand, is still "finalizing the details of our financial assistance." The U.S. Treasury – the body disbursing the funds – didn't have much to say beyond that, either, merely reiterating that it wants to get the deal done within a timeline that satisfies Chrylser's f

20

Each month, the American Pulse Survey seeks respondents' opinions regarding various political, pop culture and economic issues. Seeing that the auto bailout is a hot topic these days, it is unsurprising that much of the latest survey centered on the $17.4 billion in so-called bridge loans to the Detroit 3 automakers. So, who's to blame for the Motor City's downfall? Survey says: bad management (78.8 percent), the UAW (63.8 percent) and global economic uncertainty (57.7 percent); so say 4,117 Ame

1 / 1
Share This Post

Bridgeloans Questions

There are no questions about this topic.
Be the first to ask!

From Our Partners

Cars for Sale Near You