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46BMW to offer carbon fiber wheels in a year or two

The Citroën SM sat on the first set of production glass fiber and resin wheels in 1972 when parent company Michelin developed the exotic hoops in order to take the SM rallying. It wasn't until 2008 that we got the first all-carbon-fiber wheel for passenger cars in the form of a prototype model from Weds Sports in Japan that remained a prototype. Australian company Carbon Revolution followed that a year later with its CR-9 all-CF wheel, first introduced on the Shelby Ultimate Aero and now av

20BMW has high-volume plans for carbon fiber that go beyond Megacity

Carbon fiber has been a big success in the automotive aftermarket for years now. From interior trim pieces to strut bars on down to spoilers, the material is extremely popular and for many reasons. First, it's lightweight yet very strong. Second, it just plain looks good. And finally, it begs for attention from other car enthusiasts. While the aftermarket has been hot for this stuff for some time now, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have not exactly warmed up to widespread use of the spa

9BMW, SGL announce new carbon fiber plant in Moses Lake, WA

BMW has just announced that the company will join forces with Seattle-based SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers LLC to build a new manufacturing facility in Moses Lake, Washington. Don't get too excited just yet. The plant won't be cranking out CF bits for your 3 Series so that you can have a roof that looks like the one on your neighbor's M3 (shown above). Instead, BMW says the $100 million facility will be creating carbon-fiber reinforced plastics for the upcoming Megacity vehicle. At the same time,

11Add Lightness: BMW signs joint venture to further carbon fiber research

Now that steel and aluminum are vying for top billing as the metal of choice in Automobile Land, carbon fiber is often considered the next logical step towards reducing the prodigious weight of today's cars and trucks – especially for high performance and eco-friendly vehicles. The problem, though, is that the material is still prohibitively expensive and difficult to work with for mass production.

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