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AddOver 11,000 comments filed on EPA's ethanol rules; White House also involved

In late 2013, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed – for the first time ever – a slight slacking of the 2014 renewable fuel standard. The reason was that the US is coming up on the 'blend wall,' the overall level of ethanol in the national gasoline supply where adding any more biofuel would push the average blend in 'normal' gas above 10 percent. As we know, this is a contentious issue. So contentious that, as the EPA collects comments about the rule change, almost 1

AddEPA eases off ethanol, a bit, for first time ever

Forget raising the national ethanol blend in standard gasoline to 15 percent (E15), the Environmental Protection Agency has, for the first time ever, proposed reducing the ethanol requirement in the American gas supply.

AddAAA once again calls on feds to slow down E15 implementation

AAA is continuing its assault against higher ethanol use in the transportation energy, speaking out in support of reducing the renewable fuel mandate for 2014. The organization said that renewable-fuel requirements need to be lowered to avoid the so-called "blend wall" that could drive up gas prices. In addition to the threat of such higher prices, AAA continued to call gasoline with a 15 percent ethanol blend, or E15, "potentially damaging" to vehicles compared to the typical 10-percent blend b

AddEPA: 10% of all US fuel now renewable, but that might be our limit

recognizes that ethanol will likely continue to predominate the renewable fuel pool in the near future, and that for 2014 the ability of the market to consume ethanol in higher blends such as E85 is highly constrained as a result of infrastructure- and market-related factors. EPA does not currently foresee a scenario in which the market could consume enough ethanol sold in blends greater than E10, and/or produce sufficient volumes of non-ethanol biofuels to meet the volumes of total renewable fu

AddUSDA predicts ethanol blend wall is near, future of industry hinges on EPA's E15 decision

Ethanol has been blended with gasoline for years now in a fuel typically called E10 (which is made with 10 percent ethanol). E15 could soon become the new norm if, as industry experts predict, the U.S. reaches the "blend wall" and changes come soon.

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