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484Senate Committee Votes To Keep Driver Black Box Data Private

The legislation stipulates that the owner or lessee of the vehicle is the only person entitled to the data in the black box

Drivers are one step safer to having improved privacy behind the wheel. The Senate Commerce Committee has granted bipartisan approval to legislation that aims to protect the information on automotive Event Data Recorders (EDR), also known as black boxes.

14Senate committee votes to keep driver black box data private

Drivers are one step safer to having improved privacy behind the wheel. The Senate Commerce Committee has granted bipartisan approval to legislation that aims to protect the information on automotive Event Data Recorders (EDR), also known as black boxes. The committee concluded that the vehicle owner is the one who owns the information stored on the device.

489Black Boxes In Cars Will Be Standard By 2014

These event data recorders are already in 96 percent of vehicles

If you thought police tracking your movements via license plate scanners was creepy, you may want to check your owner's manual to see if your own car has been spying on you for decades.

266Toyota responds to video of Highlander ramming house [w/video]

There are, as they say, two sides to every story, so after we posted a video on Monday showing what an owner claimed to be a case of unintended acceleration causing her Toyota Highlander to crash into a house twice, Toyota reached out to us revealing some additional information about the incident.

488Feds Set To Mandate "Black Box" Data Recorders In Every Car And Truck

Privacy advocates worry, but technology has caught bad drivers lying about accident causes

WASHINGTON – Many motorists don't know it, but it's likely that every time they get behind the wheel, there's a snitch along for the ride.

AddAutoblog Podcast #312

More Honda Fit models, mandatory black boxes, too many GM pickups, Jeep Grand Cherokee diesel

1Submit your questions for Autoblog Podcast #312 LIVE!

We record Autoblog Podcast #312 tonight, and you can drop us your questions and comments regarding the rest of the week's news via our Q&A module below. Subscribe to the Autoblog Podcast in iTunes if you haven't already done so, and if you want to take it all in live, tune in to our UStream (audio only) channel at 10:00 PM Eastern tonight.

488Black Boxes Could Soon Help Solve Car Accidents

But privacy advocates worry about effects of mandatory data collection

Black boxes have helped investigators solve the causes of plane crashes for decades. Now authorities hope they can shed light on causes of car accidents.

149White House clears way for NHTSA to mandate vehicle black boxes

At present, over 90 percent of all new vehicles sold in the United States today are equipped with event data recorders, more commonly known as black boxes. If the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration gets its way, that already high figure will swell to a full 100 percent in short order.

80Seatbelt buckle chime to take a back seat?

A bill approved by both houses of Congress that doubles fines on vehicles not recalled in a timely fashion also weighs-in on several additional safety measures. What was once a $17-million penalty has now jumped to $35 million. In spite of these fines, The Detroit News reports that many new safety requirements were left out of the bill. One of the few requirements to make it through is the mandate for rear seat belt buckle chime systems – much like the alert system that is currently in t

56Scottish police call for cars with mandatory cruise control

The Association of Scottish Police Superintendents (ASPS) is asking the government to help them slow down drivers. Despite Scotland recording its lowest traffic fatalities since they began keeping track of the statistic, Transport Minister Keith Brown says, "... one death on our roads is one too many as far as I am concerned."

34Judge cautions jurors over Toyota conduct in sudden acceleration case

Judge James V. Selna has warned jurors in a wrongful death suit about suspicions surrounding Toyota. According to Inside Line, the warning comes tied to the automaker's conduct during an investigation of a 2008 Camry involved in a fatal crash allegedly caused by unintended acceleration. The single-car accident in Utah claimed the lives of the driver, Pual van Alfen, as well as one other passenger. Two passengers were also injured in the event on November 5, 2010. According to the report, two wee

30Toyota working on Playstation-compatible track day black box for Scion FR-S

Autocar reports Toyota and Subaru are working on ways to sharpen the GT 86, BRZ and Scion FR-S triplets. While that may mean buyers could see a convertible version of the sports coupe as soon as 2014, engineers are also working on a variety of other improvements, including a new track telemetry system. Using an onboard black box, the gadgetry will record a slew of data from track days. That's nothing new, but the cool part is buyers will then be able to upload and compare their times with other

24Senate committee passes overhaul of auto safety laws, includes hefty recall fines

Congress is gearing up for a comprehensive overhaul of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, implementing some significant safety measures for automobiles along the way. The campaign, encouraged by safety advocates for over a year now, has gained significant ground as the Senate Commerce Committee endorsed a series of measures which it will seek to incorporate into a highway reauthorization bill due for approval early in the new year.

23Cost to insure a new UK driver? Nearly $10,000/year

According to The Daily Telegraph, young drivers in Britain can pay as much as £546 per month for auto insurance. That's around $890/month at current conversion rates. The report indicates that UK drivers between the ages of 17 and 22 years old pay an average of £5,957 – around $9,640.

78NHTSA expected to mandate black boxes in all cars next month

Are you ready for a black box to be installed in your car? The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration apparently is. According to a new report from Wired, NHTSA is expected to rule next month that all new cars will need to carry just such a device.

32Report: Toyota admits black box bug can give false speed readings

Takeshi Uchiyamada, Toyota executive vice president in charge of research and development, has confirmed that a software glitch has caused the company's event data recorder readers to misinterpret speeds during accidents. According to Automotive News, the executive admits that his company had previously underscored the fact that it couldn't say whether or not there was a problem with the black boxes themselves. The software bug in the readers came to light during the manufacturer's investigation

36Report: Toyota's event data recorders have a history of problems

According to a report in The Washington Post, the event data recorders the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration used to investigate claims of unintended acceleration in Toyota vehicles have a history of problems. In one incident, a Toyota pickup that struck a tree in a single car accident was recorded as going 177 mph – far faster than any T100 we've ever seen. A separate reading from the same device put the truck's speed at a more feasible 75 mph. The article even says th

32Report: Intel developing new automotive black box

Big Brother really wants to get into your future vehicle. Intel is currently hard at work on the next generation of vehicle event data recorders, the infamous black boxes that Congress has clamored for since Toyota's unintended acceleration problems dominated headlines earlier this year. According to The New York Times, these new black boxes may do a lot more than just record things like vehicle speed and whether you're wearing your seatbelt. Intel's prototype will incorporate GPS and all of a v

99Report: U.S. safety bill could triple cost of automotive black boxes to $5,000

When word first came down that Congress was looking to mandate that all new vehicles to be sold with Event Data Recorders, we knew that the added tech was going to be pricey. According to Automotive News, if legislators have their way, the new automotive black boxes will need to be both fire resistant and waterproof. Add in a significant amount of recording time before and after an accident, and suddenly the price tag per unit could soar up to a lofty $4,000 to $5,000. Currently, the EDRs track

19USA Today investigates how automotive 'black boxes' can help recreate accidents

Long before shows like CSI misled the public about how long a DNA test takes and introduced the mythical world of "zoom and enhance," airplane black boxes were making people think you could minutely recreate an air disaster if you could just get the box. Not so. Turns out that quite a few cars sold in the U.S. have black boxes as well, with the same limitations: you can retrieve a certain set of data from them, but its quality and usefulness varies.

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