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We hear about greenhouse gases all the time, but did you know that it's possible to run vehicles on the gas from cows and even humans?


If you won't change the car, perhaps you can change the fuel. This is part of the alt-energy strategy that Volkswagen is employing as it works on electric vehicles. To wit, its project with Solazyme to make renewable diesel and also the Eco Up! vehicle.


Researchers at Kettering University, along with officials from Swedish Biogas International and Flint, MI Mayor Dayne Walling have unveiled Flint's first biomethane-powered truck. Students and faculty members at Kettering set out on the ambitious project of converting a Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD to run on a duel-fuel system supplied by Baytech. Corporation. The converted truck can automatically switch between good ol' gasoline and the renewable alternative fuel, biomethane.


What can you do with cow dung? We can think of at least one green car option: transform it into biomethane and use the gas to power a golf cart. This is what the engineers at Yamaha in Katori, in Chiba Prefecture. Osaka Gas Co. provided the methane at a low cost. It was then stored in a special tank filled with activated carbon capable of absorbing the methane at relatively low pressure. The tank was developed by Osaka Gas Co. as an alternative to a high-pressure pump and tank. The town of Kator


Clean Air Power has announced that one of Britain's largest supermarket chains, Sainsbury's, has signed a contract with them to expand the use of biomethane in their trucks. Back in August 2007, Sainsbury's tried Clean Air's technology for the first time and in August 2008, it began to operate one of its Mercedes-Benz Axor Euro 3 vehicles fitted with Clean Air Power's Genesis' Dual-Fuel combustion technology. The system will now be used in five additional units. The system burns biomethane mixed


Back in August, Gasrec and Iveco announced that they would be testing street cleaning trucks running on biomethane. Of course, it's kinda tough to use a truck on a fuel that's not available, so Gasrec, the company that's pioneering the fuel, has partnered up with Veolia Environmental Services to get the gas it needs for its liquid methane and has created a refueling point for the Iveco truck. The methane gas is coming from both landfills and through controlled digestion of waste food products. T


Gasrec, a British company that produces liquid biomethane fuel, Veolia, which works in waste management and truck manufacturer Iveco have joined forces to test a new truck. The CNG Iveco Daily Light will be run for six months on biomethane obtained from a landfill in Surrey by Gasrec. It will be compared alongside regular CNG-powered Iveco Dailys to check performance and emissions. The vehicle will be refuelled at a refuelling station installed by Gasrec at Camden Council's York Way depot. Accor


We have already covered different methods of obtaining methane by fermenting (or better, digesting) some kind of vegetable. But we haven't yet gotten to banana waste. Growcom, one of Australia's leading horticulture organisations is going from the prototype stage to a commercial plant that transforms banana waste into biomethane, which then will be used in vehicles powered by natural gas.


Recently it seems that a lot of people have found that you can make biofuels out of just about anything in the world. We've reported on algae, chicken fat and even human fat being turned into biofuels and it looks like the list of organic substances that we're willing to consider for our transport needs is only going to get longer.

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