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Sales of natural-gas powered big rigs could jump as much as fivefold this year as falling prices for both natural gas and the carbon fuel tanks required for such trucks come down, the Wall Street Journal says.


Readers of a certain age might remember those bumper stickers with Yosemite Sam toting two six-shooters and yelling "Back Off!" He wasn't yelling "So you can burn more fuel!" but researchers are looking at how tailgating could save gas, and, in this case, are working with big rigs.


The California Construction Trucking Association has filed a notice of appeal with the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. It's the latest in a two-year legal battle against the California Air Resource Board's heavy-duty, on-road truck and bus regulations. The CARB diesel engine regulation will force the replacement of most diesel-powered commercial motor vehicles that don't meet 2010 US Environmental Protection Agency standards in order to operate in the state.


If you're not sure why today's announcement from the Obama Administration about the first-ever fuel economy standards for heavy-duty trucks and buses is important, read this.


The UK's Department for Transport (DFT) has released the results of its study on the impact of longer semi-trailer trucks. The findings suggest that the use of longer trailers would slash emissions without compromising road integrity or safety.


The California Air Resources Board (CARB), in coordination with six local air districts,* is offering $106 million in funds to assist qualified diesel semi truck owners with upgrades, retrofits or replacements of their rigs in an effort to reduce emissions.


Wherever you weigh in on the peak oil debate, most Americans tend to agree that less foreign oil is in our best interests. The problem, of course, is that we can't make all the oil we need: 21 million barrels per day, give or take. We have a capacity of about 5 million barrels per day in the U.S., so the remainder comes in through Canada, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria and Venezuela.


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Warning: Don't try this! The safest distance to drive behind a big rig at 55 miles per hour is 150 feet. Driving any closer is insane because it puts you in the driver's blind spot and also does not give you enough time to respond if the big rig's driver changes speed. This post is for informational purposes only.

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