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67Detroit automakers gain Q1 market share simultaneously for first time in 20 years

While monthly sales figures might be an easy way of tracking the progression of the auto industry and individual automakers, looking at market share might be more indicative of how each company is actually standing up against its competitors. For the Detroit Three automakers, they have collectively lost almost 30 percent of the market over the last 20 years, but now, for the first time since 1993, Ford, General Motors and Chrysler have each posted market share gains at the same time in the first

75Detroit Three ask for big cuts from CAW, union unwilling to acquiesce

The Detroit Big Three are seeking "dramatic changes" in their contracts with the Canadian Auto Workers. According to a Reuters report, the CAW claims that the U.S. automakers are angling for deep pension and benefit cuts. The CAW says it has no intention of adhering to these proposed cuts.

75Will Detroit Three Survive and Thrive?

All are looking good for now... but it depends

101Analysts: U.S. automakers will lose marketshare in 2012

Domestic automakers have much to be happy about, with Chrysler, Ford and General Motors all gaining market share last year for the first time since 1988. Yet according to Bloomberg, 2012 won't be as good to Detroit. Total sales are projected to grow from 12.8 million vehicles last year to 13.6 million, according to the report, but increasing competition from Korea and a Japanese recovery from the natural disasters of 2011 mean those extra sales aren't likely headed to the Big Three.

45White collar salaries to overtake UAW labor costs next year

According to a top researcher, labor costs for salaried employees at Chrysler, Ford and General Motors will surpass those of workers represented by the United Auto Workers for the first time next year. A report in Automotive News says the calculation was performed by the Center for Automotive Research (CAR), and made public at a recent conference.

38Oil may hit $35/barrel in wake of auto bailout bust

With the U.S. Senate denying the Detroit 3 relief plan, it looks like oil prices might continue to tumble. Our sibling site BloggingStocks is predicting barrel prices might drop as low as $35 as a result. This comes on the heels of predictions of higher prices in the near future.

72Michael Moore mixed on Big 3 bailout

While there is definitely a huge rift between those who favor a Detroit bailout and those who would rather see the Big 3 fade away, you'd think that someone like Flint-native and documentary maker Michael Moore would be all in favor of helping the Big Three succeed. After all, Moore rose to fame for his first documentary entitled "Roger and Me" that featured then-CEO of General Motors Roger Smith. According to this piece in the Detroit News, however, Moore doesn't profess unconditional support f

15Auto industry advertising slump hurting old media

Mainstream media has been quick to pile on Detroit automakers, which, along with some questionable Motown metal, has helped drive nationwide perception of the Big Three into the ground. Now that times are tough at traditional media outlets, well, that's Detroit's fault, too. Back in 2004, about $24 billion was doled out to television, print, and radio ads. Fast forward to 2008, and painfully slow sales coupled with cash-strapped automakers and dealerships have cut that number to about $15 billio

48Asian brands beat Big 3 sales in May

Just less than a year ago, the Big 3 domestic automakers' combined market share dropped to less than 50-percent of the overall automobile market. That sobering statistic was made factual when the combined sales of vehicles from both Asian countries, such as Japan and Korea, were combined with sales from European companies, like Volkswagen, BMW and Mercedes-Benz. It seems that this sad state of affairs did little to stop the bleeding coming from Detroit, as last month marks the first time in hist

23Big Three market share steadily running toward empty

The Big Three's dwindling market share is no secret. We've heard about it for years. But The Plain Dealer in Cleveland took a closer look at the numbers and was surprised at just how rapidly domestic automakers have been overtaken.

25Fed official apologizes for recommending imports in newsletter

Domestic automakers may be losing market share, but it appears their clout is intact. The Department of Health and Human Services issued an apology for a recent newsletter that suggested only Japanese and South Korean vehicles in a list of 12 "green" vehicles for their 67,000 employees to buy. Domestic automakers took exception to the seemingly biased message, and the 15 Michigan members of the house wielded their power to get the HHS to apologize.

39Them are fightin' words: Lutz goes off on the 'experts'

Maximum Bob has had enough of automotive experts who question the guile of domestic execs, and as usual Mr. Lutz isn't afraid to share his thoughts with all who are willing to listen. At his recent speech at the Center for Automotive Research's annual management conference, Blogger Bob opened a GM-sized can on experts referring to Big Three executives as "Detroit Dinosaurs". Mr. Lutz asked if three independent companies with independent boards could all be "nearly imploded" at the same time beca

17Ford is not #4, still part of Big 3

After all the sales numbers for the month of January were released, reports began popping up that Ford had fallen to fourth place in sales in the U.S. last month behind General Motors, Toyota and the Chrysler Group. This is nothing more than selective journalism, with journos picking out the numbers that serve a sensational headline like "Ford's #4!". Basically, the battle for third place in sales in the U.S. is between Ford and DCX, and the victor depends on which brands you count in both compa

16Could the Big Three learn from Apple?

Associated Press Business Writer Tom Krisher makes a few good points about how the Big Three (or 2.5 if you prefer) could stand to learn from Apple's comeback. Well, ok, one good, though not exactly new, point. We've all heard it, if not said it ourselves. It's all about the product. Just like Steve Jobs saved Apple in 1998 with the innovative, highly-desired iMac, American carmakers need their own hotcake vehicle. And in reading Krisher's article, you get the impression GM, Chrysler and Ford ha

20Riding out the storm: 2007 going to be a bad year for sales

The automotive industry isn't back on the upswing yet. 2007 may prove to be a nine-year low for sales at 16.2 million units, with Detroit automakers taking the biggest hit. CSM Worldwide, leading auto industry analysts, released a report recently indicating that U.S. light-vehicle sales would drop 1.2 percent from the 16.4 million units expected to leave dealer showrooms by the end of this year.

57Toyota passes Ford, DaimlerChrysler in U.S. sales

Stepping back from July's detailed sales data for a moment, at the big picture level it's worth noting that July marked the first time that Toyota sold more cars in the U.S. than Ford. Furthermore, year to date sales figures show that Toyota has outsold DaimlerChrysler (Chrysler Group and Mercedes-Benz combined) in the U.S. market.

11New poll shows Michigan public down on domestics

Even as the domestic manufacturers lose the East and West coast, they can always count on Michiganders to buy something from the Big 3, right? A new poll by the Detroit News and WXYZ-TV7 shows that a rather surprising 51 percent think that Detroit is doing a "poor" or "only fair", and that 60 percent are "somewhat" or "very" concerned about the future prospects of the US auto industry.

13Pundits predict future of the U.S. auto industry

Marty Bernstein, contributing editor for the American International Automobile Dealers trade organization, fired up the old rolodex and quizzed a wide range of folks who spend their days trying to anticipate future trends in the U.S. auto industry, asking what the industry will look like in 2011. Their thoughts make interesting reading.

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