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Autoblog recaps the 2015 Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix, a race that came down to Mercedes' overwhelming power versus Ferrari's combination of power and strategy.


The sand, the wind, the penalties, the contact and the one crash – all of them collided to make the Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix a surprise affair from day to day and lap to lap. Oh, and did we mention the tires? Pirelli made a last-minute swap after the amusement park ride that the Chinese Grand Prix turned into with the soft compound tire, and brought medium and hard compounds to the desert. That didn't stop things from falling apart for some teams – literally – and that di


Law enforcement in Bahrain is once again cracking down on pro-democracy protesters ahead of the upcoming Bahrain Grand Prix. The Formula One race focuses the world's attention on the Middle Eastern kingdom each year, and protesters take the occasion to demonstrate against the ruling family.


At what point does a political issue become a moral one? And at what point, if any, should motor racing enter that debate? These are the questions that Formula 1 and all those involved have wrestled with since the Bahrain Grand Prix was put back on the calendar for this year.


The group of hackers known as Anonymous issued a press release last night announcing their intent to hack and take down the official website for Formula One at formulaone.com for the duration of the Bahrain Grand Prix. Their reason? To protest the increasingly violent crackdown on the people of Bahrain by their own government.


Protesters in Bahrain continue to push for democratic reforms in the country, and police have stepped up a brutal crackdown ahead of the upcoming Formula One Bahrain Grand Prix. Last year, unrest forced F1 to cancel the race, but Bernie Ecclestone, president and CEO of the series, has said that won't happen in 2012. Protestors have turned their ire against F1 organizers, saying the race belittles the strife and sacrifices of those working toward democracy. In an attempt to quell the demonstratio


Consider it official: There will be no Formula One race in Bahrain for the 2011 season. This news comes despite a meeting where the FIA's World Motor Sport Council voted to bring Bahrain back into the F1 calendar on October 30.


The start to this year's Formula 1 championship was delayed when civil unrest in the Gulf kingdom of Bahrain forced the cancellation of the season-opening Bahrain Grand Prix. Since then, a question mark has loomed over whether the round would be reinstated later in the season, and now we have our answer. In its meeting over the weekend, the FIA's World Motor Sport Council voted to bring Bahrain back into the F1 calendar on October 30.


Go back a few years and the prospect of political unrest in a host country was seldom a factor in determining where to hold a motor race. But that age of innocence appears to be behind us.


Politics and racing don't go together. Whether it's former FIA president Max Mosley's fascist sympathies or the dispute over Cyprus being played out on the podium of the Turkish Grand Prix, there's just no place for it in motorsports. But with political unrest spreading across the Arab world, it looks like revolution has gotten in the way of racing once again.


"Playing" a Fernando Alonso lap of Bahrain in a Ferrari F10 – Click above to watch video after the jump


Formula One Bahrain 2010 – Click above for high-res image gallery


The Red Bull F1 team prepares for the Bahrain GP – Click above to watch video after the jump


Everyone who speculated that, after two dismal races at the start of the season, Felipe Massa might have lost his edge, were firmly put in their place as the Ferrari driver pulled out a spectacular performance to dominate the race virtually from start to finish. His team mate Kimi Raikkonen battled it out with the likes of countryman Heikki Kovalainen (McLaren) and Robert Kubica (BMW) to cross the finish line in second place, giving Raikkonen the lead in the drivers' championship with 19 points.

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