16 Articles
1 / 1
418

Cell phones, music and alcohol increase the danger of crossing the street

On February 22, 2012, Meilan Jin was crossing an intersection at Northern Blvd. and Union St. in Queens, New York. Chatting on her cell phone as she proceeded diagonally across in an attempt to catch a van to her job at a nail salon, a city bus made a fast, wide right turn and struck her down in the road.

493

More and more elderly drivers are behind the wheel, but screening for at-risk seniors still not occurring

The first comment left on George Russell Weller's online obituary reads: "Let us not forget the grief that he caused."

73

Author Carol-Ann Hamilton walks us through a very delicate conversation

Author Carol-Ann Hamilton walks us through a very difficult conversation: Telling your parents or an elderly relative that they need to stop driving.

1

High tech system helps drivers stay between the lines

Keeping on the straight and narrow has never been so simple. And it's only going to get easier, as most carmakers begin installing Lane Departure Warning Systems to assist in the battle against distracted driving.

14

Last week, the Center for Auto Safety called on Ford to recall about 470,000 Escape utility vehicles to fix an "unintended acceleration" problem they say was caused by a previous recall repair program.

30

Safety organizations and the District of West Vancouver, Canada are joining forces to build awareness about careful driving during the start of the school year. Thanks the work of the BCAA Traffic Safety Association, drivers motoring down 22nd Street in West Vancouver will be met with a 3D image of a girl chasing a ball across the street. No one is saying exactly how the tech works, but it's meant to be a wakeup call for drivers who may be distracted or otherwise not paying enough attention to t

36

Today's autos are chock-full of safety equipment that vastly improves your chances of survival in the event of a crash. And if an automaker wants to achieve the best crash test scores, it has to ensure that parts like bumper beams, air bag sensors and radiator supports perform properly during a collision. But while automakers are concerned about their safety record, in some cases, aftermarket parts makers are more concerned with keeping costs down.

99

When word first came down that Congress was looking to mandate that all new vehicles to be sold with Event Data Recorders, we knew that the added tech was going to be pricey. According to Automotive News, if legislators have their way, the new automotive black boxes will need to be both fire resistant and waterproof. Add in a significant amount of recording time before and after an accident, and suddenly the price tag per unit could soar up to a lofty $4,000 to $5,000. Currently, the EDRs track

28

Thanks to the barrage of Toyota recalls in recent months, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration has its eyes on more power. According to The Detroit News, David Strickland (pictured), who heads up the government safety agency, recently met with the Senate Commerce Committee to discuss his agency's need for the ability to order immediate recalls, halt production or stop the importation of vehicles that pose an imminent and significant safety risk. The House of Representatives

19

Safety doesn't sell cars. At least that's what Detroit executives walked around saying back in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. The whole of them were convinced that if you even mentioned the word "safety" in a marketing campaign it would imply that cars were unsafe. In fact, it took a crusader like Ralph Nader to stand up to the auto industry and say enough with the death traps, like he did when he published his infamous Unsafe at Any Speed (only one chapter is about the Corvair!) in 1965. Like him

26

There aren't a lot of positives about being overweight, but a study by the University of Michigan shows that there could be one reason for the chunky among us to celebrate. U of M studied 300,000 traffic fatalities obtained from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration between 1998 and 2008, and it has reportedly found that overweight people had a 22 percent lower fatality rate than underweight people. However, the story changes for the worse if you're a man with a Body Mass Index (BMI

50

Is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration about to add some more safety measures to your next new car? According to The Detroit News, they might be. The Motown daily says that government officials are pondering whether or not they should require new vehicles to be fitted with lane-departure warning systems and automatic braking systems that trigger upon warning of an impending accident. Both systems are currently available only in very small percentage of new passenger cars – p

24

Oh how we all love a good car crash, but finding good, slow-motion automotive carnage on the Web hasn't been all that easy to find. Until now. Consumer Reports has put hours of crash-test video from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety online, free for anyone to see.

20

In an obvious effort to keep its readership alive (and in turn circulation numbers up) Forbes magazine has made a list of the least safe cars of 2007. Before the flame wars start, note that cars on the list are not necessarily unsafe, but instead are not as safe as other cars available. Therefore, they are the least safe 2007 model year cars.

15

The new Q7 SUV from Audi will feature a nifty safety device called Side Assist that uses radar to sense approaching vehicles in adjacent lanes and warm the driver of their impending passing. If the Q7’s turn signal is activated when another vehicle is in range, LEDs embedded in the rearview mirrors will visually alert the driver of the danger. The LEDs appear to vary their intensity as well as blink rate depending on how close the approaching vehicle is to passing.

1 / 1