12 Articles
1 / 1

Usage-based insurance could save drivers 5% to 35%

Can drivers put a price on privacy? According to a new survey from Lynx Research Consulting, they sure can. And that price is a ten-percent discount on their car insurance.


Louisiana residents pay a lot, Maine residents pay the least

According to an Insure.com study, Louisiana is number one -- in a very bad way. The Pelican State has the highest average insurance rates in the nation, beating out Michigan and Georgia to take the not-so-illustrious title for 2013.


Even with worse driving records, wealthier people quoted lower rates

Pride yourself on being a safe driver? You might be paying a penalty for that distinction. The country's largest auto insurers often charge safe drivers more money for their annual insurance premiums than their more reckless counterparts, according to a study released Monday by the Consumer Federation Of America.


Study compared annual car insurance premiums to average household income

The state that America's auto industry calls home is also the state that boasts the nation's highest car insurance rates.


Today's autos are chock-full of safety equipment that vastly improves your chances of survival in the event of a crash. And if an automaker wants to achieve the best crash test scores, it has to ensure that parts like bumper beams, air bag sensors and radiator supports perform properly during a collision. But while automakers are concerned about their safety record, in some cases, aftermarket parts makers are more concerned with keeping costs down.


Confused.com wraps an entire street in bubble wrap – Click above to watch video


In 1974, this 1965 Volkswagen Type 2 (a.k.a. 'Bus') was stolen from Washington State. Fast-forward to October 19 of this year and custom agents at the Port of Los Angeles open up a container bound for Europe only to rediscover said van. Somehow, the Bus's VIN was still in the LAPD's stolen vehicle database. Guess which 1965 Type 2 is no longer headed for Europe?


When word got out that Mark LaNeve (right) was leaving General Motors effective October 15, we weren't at all sure where the soon-to-be-former exec was heading. The Wall Street Journal has finally let the cat out of the bag, reporting that LaNeve is leaving the auto business for a marketing gig at Allstate. LaNeve will sign on as the overseer of all marketing initiatives including brand stewardship, strategy and advertising, reporting only to CEO Thomas Wilson.


A couple of weeks ago, we challenged you to take a shot at a written driving test. The test wasn't designed for rocket scientists, but a few of you justifiably complained about the confusing verbiage in some of the questions, and the fact that some laws vary from state to state. Yeah, some of you flunked.

1 / 1
Share This Post