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A Chevrolet Corvette stolen over 40 years ago might be on its way to a police auction, but the original owner is trying to get the car back.


There're a lot of things to worry about concerning your vehicle, like getting the oil changed and keeping the tires at proper pressures, but based on the latest data from the FBI, auto theft doesn't necessarily have to be one of them. According to statistics released by the National Insurance Crime Bureau, 2013 showed the lowest number of stolen cars since 1967.


A combination of truck tailgates being easily damaged and even easier to remove has made them a target for thieves for years, but the problem seems to be getting worse. According to The Detroit News, reported tailgate thefts skyrocketed from just 3 in 2008 to more than 500 last year based on information from the National Insurance Crime Bureau.


Thefts of third-row seats are on the rise, according to a report by KABC-TV 7, a trend highlighted by the recent burglary of third-row seats from 16 sport utility vehicles at a Chevrolet dealership in Simi Valley, California.


Late last month, we told you about a 1961 Volvo P1800 that had been stolen in Sweden. The thought of losing a classic coupe to an unscrupulous thief is troubling enough, but this wasn't just any P1800 – it was the very first production example minted, and the restored red-over-white two-door was owned by the vice president of the Swedish P1800 Club to boot. Chassis Number Two was pilfered from a Stockholm lockup on either August 21 or 22, and the theft triggered an international hunt of so


The National Insurance Crime Bureau has released its latest Hot Wheels study on the most popular stolen cars and trucks for 2012. The study has changed a bit from past years, with the new findings listing only the make and model of each vehicle, while taking into account all model years in its totals. Previous iterations only focused on the most stolen vehicles of a particular model year, with that make and model not appearing anywhere else on the list so as not to appear to call out a particula


Technology giant Google is a regular in headlines across the world, mostly for innovative hardware and online products, but this is the first time we've caught wind of the company stopping crime. A fascinating writeup on The Verge tells the story of Google doing just that – in China no less.


The Ford F-Series has been America's best-selling truck for decades, but along with the good comes the bad, apparently. In addition to being popular with consumers, the Highway Loss Data Institute notes that the F-Series Super Duty has risen in popularity among thieves. Based on its new study, the four-wheel drive crew cab F-250 Super Duty has topped the list for the country's highest rate of insurance theft claims, knocking the Cadillac Escalade from the top spot – a distinction the luxur


Note to budding carjackers: Learn to drive a stick shift before heading out to boost a car.


The city where your car is most likely to be stolen is in California. In fact, the top three cities are in California, and of the top 10, six are in that state. So says a report by Forbes that compares the number of stolen cars per 100,000 population.


Stealing cars is (obviously) against the law, and getting caught usually translates into a significant prison term. We're guessing the crime is just a bit stiffer if you're caught attempting to swipe the ride of a judge, especially if you just left her court room.


Watching television news can be depressing. Between the political rancor of election season and the "if it bleeds, it leads" mentality of most news directors, positive stories are scarce. But here's one that should make any lover of fine automobiles pleased.


We don't envy local law enforcement, especially in a city like Richmond, Virginia. Charged with keeping the public safe from a variety of ill forces, the job is about as thankless as they come. Recently, the RPD has adopted a new initiative in an attempt to curb vehicle break-ins. Officers on the night shift now check vehicles for valuables left in plain sight, and when they find them, the police stop by the vehicle's owner's home for a little chat. All of these "wake up calls" are most likely t


We'd guess a thief's favorite Ford Mustang is whichever one he happens to be hooning around in – ahead of either illegally selling it, stripping it for parts or falsifying its VIN to pass it off as a legit car. But the 'Stang that's attracted the most attention from this scourge of society is none other than the 2000 Mustang.


Domestic automakers have outpaced their import counterparts on the top ten list of most stolen vehicles for the first time since 2002. According to a new report by the National Insurance Crime Bureau, Ford vehicles took three places on the Most Stolen Vehicles of 2010 list, while two Chevrolet and two Dodge models also made the cut. To be fair, only the 1999 Chevrolet full-size pickup (read: Silverado) and 1997 Ford F-150 broke into the top five – those models landed themselves in fourth a


Maybe it's the mass inebriation that makes it easier, but New Year's Eve is apparently hottest holiday for car theft. If the whole world is already sleeping it off, there's no way anybody is going to pay heed to your stupid alarm, perhaps.


Luxury cars are nice. Most people would consider some kind of sacrifice to own one, while others plant their behinds in Corinthian Leather through ill-gotten gains. When something is desirable, there's no end to the scheming. The latest tactic for driving luxe without earning it is pretty blatant: just show up and take it! Automotive News reports that the FBI is currently looking into an operation that's using the identity of Atlas Towing and Recovery of Illinois, a real, legitimate business, to


The Federal Bureau of Investigations has shut down a car theft ring operating in the U.S. for more than 20 years, causing in excess of $25 million in losses to owners and banks. According to CNN, the ring would clone cars, swiping the legal identity of one car – VIN numbers, tags, stickers -- and applying it to another, stolen car. The cloned car would then be sold to a dealer or consumer, and the countdown would begin: Eventually, most would be discovered as stolen property and confiscate


var digg_url = 'http://digg.com/world_news/Cars_being_stolen_in_Scotland_and_returned_before_morning'; If you car comes up missing here in the U.S., you probably don't want it back once the thieves are done with it. Over in Scotland, they do things differently, even illegal things. Police say someone in southeast Scotland's Borders area is sneaking into houses, taking car keys and going for rides in the homeowners' cars. In this country, that'd be the end of it until the police found your Mal


In India, car smugglers are apparently a good deal more patient than we can ever recall hearing of in the States. In a case that's less 'Gone in Sixty Seconds' and more 'Gone in Sixty Hours', a man named Ramadoss made it his m.o. to purchase vehicles in Malaysia and Singapore, then dismantle them piece by piece, shipping them to his operation in Chennai (formerly Madras), where he would reassemble them. Doing so saved Ramadoss a mint on customs charges, as he had to pay just 20-25 percent (

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