9 Articles
1 / 1
57Toyota urges suppliers to slash prices or be left behind

For years, Detroit automakers would argue that the Japanese yen was artificially devalued, and that the value of the currency was a big competitive advantage to the likes of Toyota and Honda. To erase this gap, The Detroit Three pressured suppliers to lower costs in any way possible, which caused ill-will within their supply bases. In fact, Japanese automakers routinely scored higher in supplier relation studies, while General Motors, Ford and Chrysler hovered at the bottom of the list.

8Toyota still tops in supplier relations, but only just

When it comes to manufacturing and selling a complicated product like an automobile, a company's relationship with its suppliers is of huge importance. A good working partnership can translate into higher levels of reliability and lower cost as well as early access to cutting-edge tech. According to a new study conducted by Detroit-based consulting firm Planning Perspectives, Toyota has one of the best relationships with its suppliers among all of the world's automakers. The Detroit Bureau repor

5GM agrees to terms to sell Nexteer steering operations to China's PCM

General Motors reports that it has come to an agreement to sell its Nexteer steering operations. Nexteer, which had $6.2 billion in revenue as recently as 2008, was acquired by GM as part of a deal to help Delphi exit bankruptcy. The buyer? Pacific Century Motors, which is part of The Tempo Group with ties to the government in Beijing.

18Analyst: Detroit 3 to be outproduced by foreign transplants on U.S. soil by 2012

If you think life can't get any worse for the bloodied and battered Detroit three automakers and their suppliers, you're wrong – at least according to a new study from Grant Thornton LLP's Corporate Advisory and Restructuring Service. The accounting and management consulting firm used data from CSM worldwide that forecasts U.S. automakers will produce fewer vehicles on U.S. soil than Asian and European automakers by the year 2012 despite an expected return to profitability.

14Half of all major U.S. suppliers said to be bankruptcy risks in 2009

A new study by consulting firm A.T. Kearney has found that more than half of all current automotive suppliers could file for bankruptcy protection in 2009, resulting in at least 1 million job losses. Even the most optimistic scenario would have 35% of all suppliers facing insolvency, and some projections suggest as many as 70% could face restructuring through bankruptcy. No specific names were mentioned, but these suppliers could range in size from small Tier 2 companies all the way to the large

16GM to bypass Tier 1 and pay Tier 2 suppliers directly

Ever heard the saying, "It takes a village to raise a child?" Something similar could be said about the automotive industry, except the village is an assorted and wide-ranging group of auto suppliers and the child is your next new car. Currently, the major automakers only deal directly with Tier 1 suppliers, the big companies that assemble major automotive components into large modules. These modules are created using parts from Tier 2, Tier 3 or even smaller suppliers, and these companies are g

11U.S. Treasury unveils $5B Supplier Support Program

As difficult as it was for General Motors and Chrysler to secure emergency loans from the government, the supplier community that supports the auto industry has found it even more so. Until today. This morning, the Obama administration announced its Supplier Support Program, which creates a $5 billion fund to help keep payments flowing through automakers to the suppliers they work with.

20Big Three Sitting on $10 Billion Goldmine - Autoline on Autoblog with John McElroy

There's no question that the Detroit-based auto industry needs a lot of help. There's a 100-year history of how it got into the problems it's in, and some of those problems are beyond management's control.

AddSuppliers bear heavy environmental responsibility

As vehicles get more and more complex, auto suppliers will need everything in their arsenal to win major contracts from automakers. According to an article on Just-Auto (sub. req'd), by the year 2012, automotive suppliers will bear more than half of the total research and development of a given automobile. What this means for suppliers is that they need to stay at the forefront in environmental technologies. Increasingly complex systems will be necessary for automobiles to meet stringent emissio

1 / 1