68 Articles
1 / 4

New Ruling Gives Car Owners Firm Legal Ground To Modify Vehicles

In a long-awaited ruling announced Tuesday morning, the US Copyright Office granted an exemption in copyright law that will permit gearheads and home mechanics to continue repairing and modifying their cars without running afoul of existing copyright law.


Cognitive Distractions Can Last As Long As 27 Seconds After A Task

Hands-free features in new cars can be just as distracting as handheld ones, and the potential problems vary by automaker.


NHTSA Chief Wonders If Other Automakers Employ Same Tricks

Volkswagen's emissions cheating will have ramifications for the entire auto industry when it comes to dealing with regulators, says federal safety official.


Instead Of Fighting Hackers, They're Fighting The Messengers

More than anyone, Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller are responsible for alerting Americans to the hacking perils awaiting them in their modern-day cars.


If Projections Are Correct, Auto Industry Would Be Gutted

Car-sharing services and self-driving vehicles could combine to decimate the U.S. auto industry over the next quarter-century.


Copyright Office Floats Possibility Of Compromise In Hearings

By allowing vehicle security researchers to hack cars and publish details of their exploits, federal officials said they feared they could encourage people with malicious intent to infiltrate vehicles.


Arguments On Digital Millennium Copyright Act Exemptions Begin Shortly

Car owners and independent mechanics will soon learn more on whether copyright laws could hinder their ability to repair and modify vehicles.


Senate Passes Legislation Aimed At Accelerating Discovery Of Safety Flaws

In hearing after hearing last year, members of Congress took turns admonishing auto executives and federal regulators for their roles in prolonging an ongoing series of safety crises. Now, Congress is taking action.


Senators Want NHTSA to Put Autonomous Driving On Fast Track

In many circles, the prospect of autonomous and self-driving cars taking over American roads is greeted with enthusiasm. Among car enthusiasts, however, the idea of removing the driver from the driving often sounds like a soulless and grim transportation future.


A Quick Primer On The Past, Present, And Future Of Car Hacking

Modern cars are nothing more than computers on wheels. As such, they're vulnerable to hackers.


Bill authored by Markey would also strengthen drivers' privacy rights

Two days after saying automakers have little clue how to safeguard their cars from cyber attacks, US Senator Ed Markey has proposed legislation that would compel car companies to fix security holes.


Sen. Ed Markey Says Automakers 'Haven't Done Their Part' To Keep Drivers Safe

Automakers are ill-equipped to handle the growing scope of cyber threats faced by cars on American roads, a critical new report charges.


Remote Nature Of Attack Is A Worrisome Landmark

A cyber-security hole that left more than two million BMWs vulnerable may be the most serious breach the auto industry has faced in its emerging fight against car hackers.


One Company Brings Iris Identification To The Auto Industry

Someday soon, drivers may start cars with a scan of their eyes instead of the turn of a key. EyeLock, a New York company that manufactures biometric equipment, is developing a camera-based system that identifies drivers through a scanner installed in visors or rear-view mirrors.


Cars can be as easily hacked as a computer

Today's new cars come equipped with dozens of microcomputers connected by a network and run everything from infotainment systems to the engine itself. Like any other computer system, the units inside our cars are vulnerable. Hackers can infiltrate these systems. Once they're inside, they can do anything from steal your data to control your car.


Percentages of people driving to work and carpooling decline

Commuters are shedding their reliance on cars.


America's automotive industry continues to boom, with analysts predicting that sales in 2014 will reach over 16 million units while marking just the second time since World War II that the industry has seen five consecutive years of growth. The estimates, if correct, would represent a 500,000-unit improvement over the current projections for 2013.


Ford is on a roll this year, with excellent quarterly earnings and better-than-expected vehicle sales leading to 800 more job opportunities with the Blue Oval. In January, Ford announced that it wanted to hire 2,200 salaried employees, but, since then, that figure has been revised to 3,000, representing a 36-percent increase over original projections. About 1,500 of those jobs remain, 80 percent of which are technical professional positions.


Subaru Surges Ahead Of Accelerating Industry Sales


Ford And Nissan Make Big Gains, Toyota Falls


Factory in Georgetown, Kentucky will add a line to produce the car

For the first time, Lexus, one of America's most popular luxury car brands, will build cars in the United States.

1 / 4
Share This Post