20 Articles
1 / 1
Add

President Obama wants to know how many clean cars $2 billion can buy. In an announcement expected later today, the President is expected to ask Congress to use $2 billion that the government has raised from allowing oil and gas exploration in the Outer Continental Shelf to fund clean energy transportation. That means plug-in vehicles, better batteries, biofuels and compressed natural gas vehicles.

31

This could be big. The US Department of Energy has announced a five-year, $120-million award for a team of 14 companies, universities and national laboratories led by Argonne National Laboratory that will be charged with creating next-generation batteries for use in vehicles and the grid. In short, a sort of "Manhattan Project" for advanced EV packs.

24

General Motors, LG Chem and the Argonne National Lab have shared a bit more information about their new advanced battery technology licensing deal, including why it could make future GM electric cars better, safer and cheaper.

Add

Whether you want to use your Chevy Volt's batteries to drive without burning any gas or to charge your phone, a better battery is going to be a good thing. And General Motors would like to provide you with that battery, which is why it has sign a licensing deal with the DOE's Argonne National Laboratory for "advanced battery chemistry."

10

What do you get when you cross a diesel engine with its gasoline counterpart? If Steve Ciatti (pictured), a mechanical engineer at Argonne National Laboratory has anything to say about it, it'd be an offspring that is genetically superior to its parents. Taking the best features of diesel engines (high efficiency) and gasoline engines (lower particulate matter and nitrogen oxide emissions), a blend of the two might be the holy grail of modern, liquid-fueled engine design.

15

Ford Escape plug-in hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

50

Don Hillebrand understands electric vehicles and their benefits and limitations. As the director of the Center for Transportation Research at the Argonne National Laboratory, he has done plenty of testing on all kinds of alternative drive vehicles. Speaking to the Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress on Wednesday, Hillebrand acknowledged that despite advances in lithium ion technology, battery electric vehicles still have not evolved far enough to capture a significant share of the mai

21

The United States Department of Energy has granted IBM 24 million hours of computing time on the supercomputers at the Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The reason? Research on lithium air batteries. Lithium air batteries hold a lot of potential for dramatically increasing energy density for electric vehicles, potentially up to 5,000 watt-hours per kilogram.

3

Auto recycling in the U.S. – Click above to watch the video after the break

6

Click above to watch the video after the break

3

Today, the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the University of Kentucky, the University of Louisville and Argonne National Laboratory have announced a partnership to develop advanced battery technology for automotive use. There's no doubt that most of the biggest hurdles to overcome before electric vehicles really become a mainstream option for more Americans involve the batteries. Even today's most advanced battery packs, made from lithium ion cells, can't come close to approaching the total energy den

6

Perhaps a flock-like approach to building lithium batteries for vehicles is what it'll take. A new alliance has been formed between the Argonne National Laboratory and 14 US companies to try and "perfect" li-ion batteries for cars, the lab announced this week. The alliance, called The National Alliance for Advanced Transportation Battery Cell Manufacture, will ask for between $1 and $2 billion from the US government over five years to help with the task. Much has been made of the way that Americ

5

My friend Lou Ann Hammond sat down with Don Hillebrand of the Argonne National Lab following last week's unveiling of the Chevy Volt. Argonne has developed some very promising lithium ion battery chemistry. The work done at Argonne is funded in large part by the U.S. Department of Energy, which can be translated as taxpayer dollars. It's nothing unusual for governments to fund basic research or for the results of that research to be licensed to private companies for commercialization. However, i

21

There was a panel discussion at this week's SAE Congress that I couldn't pass up. Titled "Fuel Cell Vehicle Panel: Challenges Remaining for Commercialization," the session was a bit of a brainstorm on just how we might one day drive hydrogen-fueled cars with some of the people who are working quite diligently on the problem today. The panel featured Dr. Massimo Venturi, CTO of NuCellsys GmbH, Germany, Dr. Kev Adjemian, senior principle engineer, Nissan Fuel Cell Laboratory, Michigan, and Dr. Jam

10

There are many hurdles standing in the way of hydrogen becoming widespread as an energy carrier for our vehicles, either by the direct burning of it in internal combustion engines or in fuel cells. Very few hydrogen refueling centers exist today, and the gas is difficult to capture, transport and store. One thing is certain regarding hydrogen, though: it can offer extremely low emissions, as it does in BMW's hydrogen-burning V12 engine.

1

Whether or not you believe in global warming, nitrogen-oxides, or NOx, definitely does contribute to acid rain and smog, which are not debatable. Because NOx is emitted in large quantities from the exhaust of diesel engines, something needs to stop it from entering our atmosphere. One way to do this is with urea, which is being used in the Bluetec systems installed by various automakers. Because people don't like to think about carrying around a container of urea (think urine, although it is usu

Add

AutoblogGreen readers got a preview of Don Hillebrand's Thursday speech at the EDTA Conference on Wednesday. Hillebrand, director of the Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory, had his presentation set and ready to go when I spoke with him early in the week, but by the time he got up to the podium on Thursday, the message had changed. Rick Wagoner had announced GM's upcoming PHEV, after all, so the landscape was reworked. Throwing a little bit of a pessimistic view on

3

On Thursday, Don Hillebrand, director of the Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory, will give a talk at the EDTA Conference about the path to commercialization for plug-in hybrids (PHEV). But why wait until then to hear what he's got to say? You can click here and hear him now (MP3 file, 4 MB). Hillebrand met with AutoblogGreen late on Tuesday at the conference and shared his insights on the rumor of GM's upcoming PHEV, the best combination of powertrains for fuel eco

1 / 1