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Still, there are worse things for the environment.

A new study compares the water usage of various fuels, and shows room for improvement for alternative fuels.

General Motors, LG Chem and the Argonne National Lab have shared a bit more information about their new advanced battery technology licensing deal, including why it could make future GM electric cars better, safer and cheaper.

Whether you want to use your Chevy Volt's batteries to drive without burning any gas or to charge your phone, a better battery is going to be a good thing. And General Motors would like to provide you with that battery, which is why it has sign a licensing deal with the DOE's Argonne National Laboratory for "advanced battery chemistry."

Ford Escape plug-in hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

Judging by the table shown above, lithium-air (Li/O2) batteries appear to be quite remarkable, on paper at least. But what can we really expect from this new advanced battery technology? Well Argonne National Laboratory has started researching and testing lithium-air batteries in earnest and presents a strong case that the future of electric vehicles may very well ride on this technology. If initial research turns out to be accurate, lithium-air batteries could hold up to ten times more energy t

Don Hillebrand understands electric vehicles and their benefits and limitations. As the director of the Center for Transportation Research at the Argonne National Laboratory, he has done plenty of testing on all kinds of alternative drive vehicles. Speaking to the Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress on Wednesday, Hillebrand acknowledged that despite advances in lithium ion technology, battery electric vehicles still have not evolved far enough to capture a significant share of the mai

The United States Department of Energy has granted IBM 24 million hours of computing time on the supercomputers at the Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The reason? Research on lithium air batteries. Lithium air batteries hold a lot of potential for dramatically increasing energy density for electric vehicles, potentially up to 5,000 watt-hours per kilogram.

Auto recycling in the U.S. – Click above to watch the video after the break

Click above to watch the video after the break

Today, the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the University of Kentucky, the University of Louisville and Argonne National Laboratory have announced a partnership to develop advanced battery technology for automotive use. There's no doubt that most of the biggest hurdles to overcome before electric vehicles really become a mainstream option for more Americans involve the batteries. Even today's most advanced battery packs, made from lithium ion cells, can't come close to approaching the total energy den

My friend Lou Ann Hammond sat down with Don Hillebrand of the Argonne National Lab following last week's unveiling of the Chevy Volt. Argonne has developed some very promising lithium ion battery chemistry. The work done at Argonne is funded in large part by the U.S. Department of Energy, which can be translated as taxpayer dollars. It's nothing unusual for governments to fund basic research or for the results of that research to be licensed to private companies for commercialization. However, i

There are many hurdles standing in the way of hydrogen becoming widespread as an energy carrier for our vehicles, either by the direct burning of it in internal combustion engines or in fuel cells. Very few hydrogen refueling centers exist today, and the gas is difficult to capture, transport and store. One thing is certain regarding hydrogen, though: it can offer extremely low emissions, as it does in BMW's hydrogen-burning V12 engine.

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