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J.D. Power has just revealed the results of its 2013 APEAL Study, which looks at which brands have the most appealing cars based on sales figures, dealer inventory, brand loyalty, transaction and trade-in prices. The study was revamped for 2013, and places a larger focus on the new tech and infotainment options available to customers. All told, study participants gauged their vehicles on 77 different attributes, delivering a score out of a 1,000 points.

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You've seen the opening to Annie Hall, right? Where Woody Allen tells the classic joke about two women grumbling about their dinner? The one complains that the food is terrible, while the other, agreeing, says the portions are too small. That's the automotive infotainment business in a nutshell.

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Ford has taken it on the chin from J.D. Power since the carmaker rolled out its new MyFord Touch system in the 2011 Explorer. Ford's ranking in the influential Initial Quality Survey dropped from fifth last year all the way down to 23rd, in large measure because of customer dissatisfaction with the new technology and its voice recognition interface, but also because of refinement complaints about the PowerShift dual-clutch transmission in the Fiesta. But unlike, say, the Houston Cougars, who plu

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J.D. Power loves to know what you think about new cars and the companies that make them. One of their annual reports is called the APEAL study, which looks at automotive performance, execution and layout, and this analytic look at makes and models is tallied up within a 1,000-point scale. The average score for the entire industry currently sits at 781, which is an improvement over last year's average of 778.

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Click above for gallery of the graphics from J.D. Power and Associates

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Consumers like new cars. That's the shocking result of the 2006 J.D. Power and Associates Automotive Performance, Execution and Layout Study, which measures owner "delight" with the design, content, layout and performance of their new vehicles. The 11th annual APEAL (get it?) study found that all-new models or models with an extensive redesign received higher APEAL scores, which are usually linked to better sales and higher profits for carmakers.

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