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Program Mandated By FCA's Consent Order With Feds

Certain car owners whose Chrysler vehicles contain dangerous defects will soon have a way to get rid of their lemons without losing money.


The Obama administration has proposed tough new fuel economy standards to improve fuel efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide pollution from trucks and vans.


After a one-year investigation, NHTSA is implementing changes to improve its oversight of vehicle safety. The agency is also asking an independent, three-person panel to monitor how these improvements are implemented.


NHTSA and the US Department of Transportation are holding a public hearing on July 2 into FCA US' response to 20 recalls from between 2013 and 2015. The Feds are also requiring the automaker to submit detailed documents about each of these campaigns by June 1.


The Department of Transportation is fining Graco $10 million for delaying its recall of 6.1 million car seats last year. The safety campaign began because latches on some of the company's products could be very difficult to unfasten, which could put children in danger.


US Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx believes the Office of Defects Management, which investigates recalls, is under-employed and needs a higher budget. He's hoping to triple the amount of money the office receives under President Obama's proposed budget.


The US Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are adding crash imminent braking and dynamic brake support to the list of recommended safety features under the New Car Assessment Program. They are not mandated technologies, simply encouraged for new vehicle buyers.


"Right now, there are so many structurally deficient bridges in America that, if you lined them up end-to-end, they'd stretch from Boston to Miami."


At this point, there's little question that General Motors deserves the bulk of the blame for not recalling the millions of vehicles affected by the ignition switch problem earlier than it did. And to a large degree, GM is facing the music and accepting blame for its mistakes, even if that acceptance won't bring back the 13 or more deaths attributed to the faulty components. But does GM deserve all the blame?


Automaker Also Agrees To 'Unprecedented Oversight' By NHTSA

General Motors has agreed to a $35-million fine levied by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration following its delayed reporting of the deadly ignition switch problem that has affected millions of the company's vehicles.


The United States Highway Trust Fund is getting closer to running out, and the federal government is scrambling to find a way to keep it in the black. The fund pays for a significant portion of the upkeep for the country's interstates, bridge repairs and some public transportation projects. It's currently backed under a two-year law that expires in September, but Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx claims the actual money in the account will be gone by the end of August. Without new financi


Throughout General Motors' ignition switch recall, the embattled, Detroit-based manufacturer has maintained the mantra that some 2.6 million recalled vehicles were safe to drive, provided certain precautions were taken.


With the debate about how to fund the US interstate system already raging, there may be another big highway controversy on the horizon. The US Department of Transportation might slow down some of the vehicles on the nation's roads by mandating speed governors on semi trucks.


Your car is about to get a lot more chatty. The Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced today that Vehicle-To-Vehicle (V2V) technologies will be coming to all new cars. At some point in the future. Most likely.


Attention, American public: Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx, seen above with his wife and children, has now officially been sworn in as your new Secretary of Transportation. Not that it comes as a surprise, of course, being that Foxx had been nominated by President Obama a few months ago.


Anthony Foxx, labeled by President Obama as "one of the most effective mayors Charlotte [North Carolina] has ever seen," has been nominated by the President to be the next Secretary of Transportation. Foxx would take over for Ray LaHood, who announced that he would be stepping down a few months ago.

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