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Current Standard Unchanged Since 2008

Like a certain Hobbit, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants to take a closer look at Smaug. Sorry, smog. The EPA is on a bit of a kick in thinking about cleaner air standards, which makes sense since the winds of change are blowing. Europeans are taking a closer look at diesel emissions and health organizations are understanding just how bad exhausted air can be (think more asthma and cancer).


CARB, SCAQMD Signed Off On New Rules

The air in Los Angeles is better than it has been in the past, but that isn't stopping four environmental and health groups from suing the EPA to do a better job. Two national groups (the Sierra Club and the Natural Resources Defense Council) are filing the lawsuit with two local groups (Physicians for Social Responsibility-Los Angeles and Communities for a Better Environment) in the Ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals against the EPA's "deficient smog plan," as Earth justice attorney Adrian Marti


In John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath," Tom Joad and his family were drawn to California's Central Valley on hopes for a better future. Now, prospective electric vehicle drivers may be drawn there for a better present – in the form of cash.


In a statement released this morning, President Barack Obama urged Lisa Jackson, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to withdraw its proposed draft of Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), leaving in place Bush-era regulations.


Here's a novel idea: rather than installing air quality sensors in fixed locations, why not use mobile sensors to collect data in an evenly spread-out area?


The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to approve California's air quality measures for fine particles (aka PM2.5) in the smog-filled South Coast and San Joaquin Valley regions. These measures aim to reduce pollution to the level required by the 1997 PM2.5 standard (NAAQS) by 2015.


Back in June of 2010, the picturesque city of London recorded its 36th "bad air" day of the year. That was a problem since European Union (EU) guidelines allow just 35 "bad air" days a year, so reaching that unfortunate level by the sixth month of 2010 meant that London was in violation of the law.


The picturesque city of London has recorded its 36th "bad air" day this year after monitoring equipment detected dangerous levels of minute airborne particles. EU guidelines allow just 35 "bad air" days, so reaching this unfortunate level by the sixth month of the year means that London is in violation of the law and faces stiff fines and numerous court cases. Also, London's air pollution is now considered to be the worst in all of Europe.


Move over Los Angeles, the city of Houston, Texas is now also officially on the "severe smog problem" list. The reclassification was requested by Governor Rick Perry last year and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) made the change last Thursday. This move from "moderate" bypasses the level of "serious" and gives the state an additional nine years to meet federal health standards that were originally set in 1997. They were supposed to meet the goal by 2010. Although the 1997 levels are now

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