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38Report: U.S. breaks even if GM stock hits $133.78

According to Neil Barofsky, the treasury department's inspector general, in order for the U.S. government to break even on its investment in General Motors, the company's stock will have to hit at least $133.78 a share. Thanks to the massive auto industry bailout, the government currently holds a total of 304 million shares of common stock and $2.1 billion in preferred stock in the automaker. According to The Detroit News, Barofsky has said that he will keep a close eye on the GM IPO in order to

35Chrysler pays back $1.9B in gov't loans

Since General Motors and Chrysler entered bankruptcy last spring, GM has stolen the lion's share of the headlines. The General has made front page news with new products, a government loan payback and first quarter profits, while Team Pentastar has quietly gone about the business of returning to respectability. Chrysler took another step towards its goal this week as the company paid back another $1.9 billion in government loans to the federal government. In total, Chrysler has paid back $3.9 bi

77Report: GM to announce repayment of federal loans in full on Wednesday

According to The Detroit News, General Motors will announce that it is fully repaying the federal loans it received last summer from both the United States and Canadian governments. In total, General Motors will have paid back about $6.7 billion ($2 billion of which has already been returned) of the $50 billion it received from the U.S., the majority of which was recovered by acquiring a 61-percent share of the automaker.

39Write-downs lead to GM loss of $4.3 billion

General Motors has just announced it has completed fresh-start accounting as part of its quest to return to public ownership, and the numbers don't exactly look good. GM says that it will announce a $4.3 billion loss for the fourth-quarter of 2009.

24Report: Congressional panel doubts GMAC business case, suggests breakup

"The panel is deeply concerned that Treasury has not required GMAC to lay out a clear path to viability or a strategy for fully repaying taxpayers." This, according to a Congressional Oversight Panel that was created as a watchdog for the U.S. Treasury's Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) funds. The fix? Potentially breaking GMAC up into units and merging its auto lending business back into General Motors.

33GM future hinges on success of new debt-for-equity swap offers

In addition to announcing the shuttering of Pontiac, General Motors has put forth a new offer to its bondholders to exchange $27 billion in claims for equity in the struggling automaker.

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