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136US Treasury reports $9.7B loss on GM shares

The US Treasury has announced a $9.7 billion loss on the $49.5 billion it used to bailout General Motors in 2009, according to a report from the The Detroit News, which in turn cites the quarterly report from the Special Inspector General of the Troubled Asset Relief Program to Congress.

68US Treasury sells $877 million in GM stock

The United States Treasury has shuffled another 135 to 137 million shares of General Motors stock as it continues its exit from the Detroit-based manufacturer. According to The Detroit News, the July sale netted the government $876.9 million, which was valued between $34 and $37 per share.

121Treasury needs GM stock to be worth $95.51 to break even

Special Inspector General Christy Romero has delivered another report to Congress on the state of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) up to June 6 of this year, assessing numbers to the US Treasury's remaining stake in General Motors. After stock sales in February and another a few months later, the Fed is still the owner of 14 percent of GM, totaling 189 million shares, and is $18.1 billion in the hole after the $49.5 billion loan to the automaker. Although the share price has risen more t

57Treasury to begin selling off more GM stock

Reuters reports that earlier this week the US Treasury announced the sale of another tranche of General Motors stock. It didn't say how many of the 241.7 million shares it holds in the automaker it would sell, nor exactly when – the discretion apparently intended to keep hedge funds from profiting from the situation. The government's ownership is broken down into common and diluted shares, representing close to 18 percent of the company at the moment, down from the 60.8 percent it owned in

116US Treasury denies pay hikes for GM, Ally execs

In December, the US Treasury granted General Motors the rights for the company to once again buy corporate jets and for its executives to fly on them, but neither those execs nor the ones at Ally Financial will get any raises this year. The automaker, worried that top talent might leave for higher-paying pastures, reportedly sought a more "market-based approach to executive compensation" for 12 of its top 25 execs. Because the federal government still has stakes in both GM and Ally, though, the

27Treasury says auto bailout tally drops to $20.3 billion

In December, the US Treasury announced that it was going to sell all of its shares in General Motors within 12 to 15 months. The first tranche of the 500-million total shares was purchased by GM, which took 200 million of them at $27.50 per share. That price represents an eight-percent premium over the market price at the time. The remaining 300 million shares will be sold "through various means in an orderly fashion."

43Former CEO Whitacre urges Treasury to sell stake in General Motors

Former General Motors chairman and CEO Ed Whitacre is in the papers today, specifically the Opinion section of The Wall Street Journal, espousing a strong belief that the U.S. Treasury should get out of GM's hair as quickly as possible. Whitacre's sentiments come, no doubt, as a response to the recent news that GM has been pressuring the Treasury to sell off its remaining 500 million shares of the company's stock.

246Feds expect greater loss on auto bailout

The saga of the U.S. Treasury's involvement with General Motors has become the theater of call and response: the call is Treasury announcing how much it stands to lose on its bailout of GM, the response is a turgid chorus of "Government Motors!" and "They should have died!" peppered with a few defenders trying to make themselves heard. Well, here we go again, since the latest Treasury report filed states that it stands to lose $25.1 billion on the 500 million shares of GM stock it still owns.

45Watchdog says White House needs exit strategy for GM, Ally

Christy Romero, a special inspector general examining the corporate bailouts that came in the wake of 2008's financial crisis, has some advice for the U.S. government: "Treasury should develop a concrete exit plan for GM and Ally." She is referring, of course, to the 30-percent stake that the government still holds in General Motors and the 74-percent stake it holds in Ally Financial, formerly known as GMAC when the Treasury pumped $17 billion into it.

21Treasury suggests GM buy back troubled Ally Financial

Back when Ally Financial was known as GMAC Financial, the U.S. Treasury gave it $17.2 billion in TARP funds to weather the global economic crisis. GMAC is now Ally Financial, and although it has repaid $5.4 billion of what it was loaned, there doesn't seem to be a clear path for repaying the outstanding amount. Bloomberg reports that Ally's mortgage unit, Residential Captial (ResCap), is teetering on the ledge of bankrupcty, and its banking operations didn't perform well in the Federal Reserve's

9Judge tosses out suit by Delphi pensioners against Treasury

The Detroit News is reporting that a federal judge has thrown out a portion of the lawsuit brought against the federal government by Delphi retirees. The former employees of the automotive supplier brought suit against the federal government after their pensions were terminated in bankruptcy proceedings. U.S. District Judge Arthur Tarnow dismissed claims against the U.S. Treasury Department, Timothy Geithner, the auto task force, Steven Rattner and Ron Bloom, though the judge did allow the lawsu

53Federal auto bailout losses estimated at $14 billion

The federal bailout of General Motors and Chrysler cost U.S. taxpayers roughly $80 billion back in 2009, but only two years later, it appears Uncle Sam will get most of its money back. The Associated Press reports that the Obama Administration now estimates that the bailout will "only" cost taxpayers $14 billion. That's down significantly from the projected 60 percent loss estimated by the Treasury Department back in 2009, and the money is also expected to arrive much sooner than originally expe

38Report: U.S. breaks even if GM stock hits $133.78

According to Neil Barofsky, the treasury department's inspector general, in order for the U.S. government to break even on its investment in General Motors, the company's stock will have to hit at least $133.78 a share. Thanks to the massive auto industry bailout, the government currently holds a total of 304 million shares of common stock and $2.1 billion in preferred stock in the automaker. According to The Detroit News, Barofsky has said that he will keep a close eye on the GM IPO in order to

53Lutz: Auto execs are underpaid

To clarify, Bob Lutz is specifically talking about General Motors' top 25 execs. They are the ones who have seen their salaries decline by 31%, and their total remuneration packages go down by more than 20%. Said Lutz, "given the rigors of the job and demands and the accountability, I would say we are being paid way, way, way below market."

13REPORT: 'Old' Chrysler defaulting on loan obligations

Before there was a Motors Liquidation Co, post-bankruptcy GM's hived-off shelter for useless assets, there was Old Carco LLC. That's the company Chrysler built to house its useless assets, and unsurprisingly, it doesn't have good news for unsecured creditors. Old Carco was left with liabilities of $20.5 billion, but has less than half of that to pay off everyone it owes.

43BREAKING: Chrysler lenders, U.S. Treasury reportedly agree to terms [*UPDATED]

Details are scarce at the moment, but word is emerging that Chrysler's lenders have reached a deal with the U.S. Treasury Department that could help stave off bankruptcy.

60REPORT: Obama dropping "car czar" in favor of task force

While there have been rumors and suggested candidates floated for the so-called federal "car czar" post, it now no longer looks like that position will be filled. That's because President Barack Obama has apparently gone cold on the idea. Instead, new reports suggest that he will look to a select group of senior economic advisers for guidance.

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