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14Ford on track to reach goal of doubling flex-fuel vehicle production

Turn back the clock to 2006, when Ford Motor Company announced it was taking flex-fuel vehicles seriously. That year, the company built 185,000 autos that could run on gasoline, ethanol or any combination of the two up to E85 (85 percent ethanol). Ford also pledged that the company's production of flex-fuel vehicles would double by 2010.

1Ford fleet vehicles gets greener with addition of E85, EcoBoost, electric drive and so on

Ford Transit Connect Taxi – Click above for high-res image gallery

25Report: Ford source says three-cylinder EcoBoost won't come to U.S. before the right vehicle does

Just a few days back, Ford unveiled a brand new EcoBoost engine in Beijing. This engine, a 1.0-liter inline three-cylinder, will become one of the company's most efficient powerplants ever. Aside from engine size and number of cylinders, Ford was reluctant to release any more information for us to go on, but we speculated that the engine would produce about 105 horsepower and maybe find its way into a Fiesta in the future. In addition, we expect diesel-like efficiency and around 50 miles per gal

9Earth Day honoree: Bill Ford, from crazy environmentalist to industry innovator

Let's sit down for a moment and think back to 1988. Have a clear picture yet? Neither did we, at first, so here's a refresher. Back then, environmentalists were likened to extremists. Their viewpoints were thought to be so far-fetched and disconnected from popular views that they were outsiders, even weirdos. In some ways, Bill Ford fit into that group of crazy environmentalists. Not a major problem, unless you're hired as the director of Ford Motor Company – then it's a huge complication.

32Ford executive chairman says electric vehicles will be a game changer

Ford executive chairman Bill Ford closed out the 2010 SAE World Congress with a reminder: "All the early cars were electric." Why do so few people remember that electric cars date back more than a hundred years? Ford suggested it's because, electric cars have "been around really for the past century or so, but they really haven't had mass market appeal." There's the answer: without mass market appeal, technologies will be forgotten.

39Ford considers moving electric vehicle production in-house if demand is high enough

Ford Motor Company's development of upcoming battery-electric vehicles (BEVs) has been, so far, an outside job. Electric versions of the Transit Connect and the Ford Focus were developed with the help of suppliers Azure Dynamics Inc. and Magna International Inc., but Ford has not ruled out producing future BEVs in-house. As Ford's director of electrification programs Sherif Marakby stated:

44Demand, demand! Ford won't bring diesels to U.S. until buyers show interest *UPDATE

Automakers are constantly questioned about their choices. From green-lighting production of an awful vehicle to offering gadgets and gizmos that consumers don't want, it seems automakers regularly make some less-than-ideal decisions. Sometimes, though, it's what automakers don't offer that creates a stir, the diesel engine being a prime example. U.S. buyers have been left out in the cold while Europeans enjoy their wonderfully efficient, diesel-powered vehicles.

35Ford to save $1.2M/year just by turning off its computers at night

When a corporation as large as Ford decides to do something as simple as shutting down its computers at night, the savings can be astronomical. In the case of Ford, powering down computers can save the company $1.2 million each year.

21Ford to save millions of dollars, drastically reduce carbon emissions just by turning off its computers at night

When a corporation as large as Ford decides to do something as simple as shutting down its computers at night, the savings can be astronomical. In the case of Ford, powering down computers can save the company $1.2 million each year.

19Mulally pockets $28 million in 2006

Reuters is reporting that while Ford Motor Co. posted a $12.7 billion loss last year, its new Chief Executive earned $28.18 million. And that was for four months worth of work. Alan Mulally's pay for 2006 included salary and stock options, as well as an $18.5 million bonus. The man Mulally replaced, Chairman Bill Ford, had made good on his pledge to forego compensation until the company made a turnaround, and had no salary, bonuses, or stock earnings during the first 8 months of 2006. In the gra

24Toyota poised to take #2 spot from Ford

Ford Motor Co. has admitted what we saw coming for some time. The New York Times just ran a story saying Ford has announced that they fully expect Toyota to take over as number two behind General Motors. At least in America. Perhaps not unexpected, but it still sounds weird to hear that Ford won't be #2. To put this in perspective, Ford has been number two since the 1920s! And if that's not enough, Ford says the projections show they think that third place might be their permanent new slot. Appa

24Ford neuters the beancounters

Ford just amended its bylaws to take a little fiscal power away from its board. In the old version of the bylaws, the finance committee could greenlight spending on product development projects. Under the new one, not so much. The Dow Jones MarketWatch learned about this item through a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Apparently the board will still be able to review how things are done regarding the management of Ford's financial affairs, but the ability to ok items will be r

17Whither the white collar: Ford set to buyout 10,000 salaried workers

Here come the pink slips for the white-collar guys and gals at Ford. And to speed up the exodus, 6 preprogrammed tags have been added to those termination notices. Actually, Ford Motor Co. is starting to offer buyouts to many of its salaried employees to help trim its U.S. payroll. As many as 85 percent of each department's workers will get the option of the buyout. Ford is looking to rid itself of 10,000 of its 38,500 salaried workers by 2008.

17Q4 for Ford will be even worse, stock prices still rise

Oh boy. It looks like the $5.8 billion loss Ford just reported isn't the end of the red ink for the foreseeable future. On Oct. 23, new Ford Motor Co. CEO Alan Mulally had to announce those huge third-quarter losses, the biggest quarterly loss since 1992. The Premier Automotive Group (the luxury group that includes Land Rover, Aston Martin, Jaguar, and Volvo), alone was responsible for $600 million of that loss. Now the company has announced that fourth-quarter earnings will also be dismal due t

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