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AddBeyond 2016, automakers push for even stronger CAFE regulations, maybe a gas tax too

It's not all that often that you hear automakers cry out for stronger regulations and stricter guidelines. In fact, the cries typically go the other way, begging for less oversight and looser laws. So, when automakers band together suggesting changes to CAFE guidelines beyond 2016 that would take fuel economy figures to new heights, we should probably listen, right?

AddEPA opens up public comment window on CA emissions waiver

President Obama announced in January that he was asking the EPA to reconsider a December 2007 decision by the Bush Administration's to deny California an emissions rules waiver (for background, read this). Today, the EPA is holding a (the first?) public hearing on the subject in Arlington, Virginia (for specifics, click past the jump). Earlier this year, we heard that the EPA would accept comments from the public for at least 45 to 60 days, but the comment period ends on April 6.

41Bush declines to enact higher fuel-economy standards

Fuel efficiency. It's an issue that has seemingly fallen onto America's the back-burner for a variety of reasons, not the least of which are declining fuel prices and economy along with the auto industry's financial plight. Still, few would argue that the issue of cutting down on petroleum use is any less important today than it was six months ago, so the decision (or, really, the lack thereof) of the Bush Administration to leave future fuel economy standards on the table for President-Elect Bar

43EPA now turns attention to boats, lawn mowers and weed whackers

Automobile emissions have been cleaned up to the point that flowers virtually sprout from tailpipes, but there's an entire category of internal combustion that the EPA calls Non-Road Engines, which the agency deems still needs improvement. To that end, standards are tightening in 2010 and 2011 for boats, personal watercraft and lawn equipment. The new restrictions will see car-like catalytic converters fitted to engines that power these machines, which will likely lead to price increases. The EP

AddBush Administration to leave emissions regulations to next President

Way back in April of last year, or own Sam Abuelsamid suggested that the Bush Administration would surely leave any EPA regulations on greenhouse gas emissions to the next President, whomever that may be. It seems that he was right in that assessment, as the EPA is expected to announce later today that it will hold off on creating any specific emissions regulations for the time being. The EPA was told by the Supreme Court in 2007 that it had to either justify its inaction regarding greenhouse ga

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