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AddSlate: Worst part of oil spill could be return of Big Ethanol

The BP oil spill has reminded us that whether we love ethanol or hate it, it's still loads better than crude oil. Or at least that's what the corn ethanol lobbies would have us believe, according to Slate.

AddThe Oil Drum presents one vision of the oilpocalypse in the Gulf

BP and the US government haven't been as forthcoming with details about the company's oil spill as some of us would like. Lack of clear information often breeds speculation, and what follows is certainly speculation. That being said, those of us who write for ABG and you, our readers, often deal with absolutes: the most efficient battery design, the fastest charge time, the largest miles-per-gallon number. So we can't help but wonder, what is the absolute worst case scenario for the BP oil spill

AddBP buys into Kevin Costner's oil spill clean up plan, orders 32 separators

One of the weirdest parts of the BP oil spill is the work that actor Kevin Costner is doing to help clean up the spill. Except that it's really not that weird at all. We just weren't that aware of the work Costner has been doing on oil cleanup work with his Costner Industries company and Ocean Therapy Solutions since his interest was piqued after the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989. After all this time developing and promiting his oil separation devices, OTS now has some good news to report: BP is "e

56Video: What happens when coffee gets spilled at BP headquarters?

How BP handles a coffee spill – Click above to watch the video after the jump

AddBP logo redesign contests popping up everywhere - is this overkill?

You'd have to be living in a deep, dark hole somewhere in the middle of nowhere to not have heard anything about the massive oil spill in the Gulf Of Mexico. And you better not come out of your cave just yet, since not a day pass that we don't hear about this continuing disaster. We should be hearing about this, because it's a tragic event and British Petroleum (BP) deserves to take heat for its actions (or lack thereof) that led to the explosion and ensuing catastrophic spill. Even though BP ha

AddRename the post-spill BP, win a can of anchovies in oil!

When a major public relations calamity strikes a large corporation. the situation can be addressed in multiple ways. The best approach is surely to address the problem quickly and effectively and rely on the public to recognize that you've done the right thing. Such a tactic worked remarkably well for Johnson & Johnson following the Tylenol poisoning incident in 1982. The other major approach is to obfuscate, spin and ultimately re-brand.

AddGot hair? Donate your locks to make oil booms

For weeks, oil has been gushing into the Gulf of Mexico at a rate of somewhere between 5,000 and 47 zillion barrels a day and BP still has no clear plan to stop it. Now, everyone from the U.S. Government to Kevin Costner to those fellas down in Florida with the hay are doing their part to clean up the mess. Add to that list a group of young graphic designers who got together in Belfast, Maine recently to shave the heads of townspeople and make hair booms to help sop up the crude.

40BP "buzz" rating falls below Toyota after oil spill

British consumer research firm YouGov BrandIndex polls 5,000 adults every weekday to allocate a so-called buzz rating to some of the most important consumer brands in the world. The buzz rating of a brand can fluctuate wildly if, for example, a new product or service is announced. Let loose a piece of really good news and your buzz rating can hit 100 points. But negative news about a brand can send the buzz factor plummeting to minus 100 points. Sounds like TMZ-style ratings for corporations to

AddVideo: Hay, here's a great idea how to clean up the BP oil spill

CW Roberts employees demonstrating hay's ability to remove oil from water – click above to watch the video

AddDiscussion fodder: Could there be an environmental disaster like the Gulf spill if we got off oil?

The Diane Rhem Show had a good hour-long discussion about BP's ever-worsening oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico this morning and it got us to thinking. We're all familiar with what happens during a tragedy like this, even when it turns out to be a lot worse than we originally thought, but what about fifty years from now when oil-burning cars are the minority? (they will be the minority by then, right?) As we shift away from petroleum, what other problems might we be creating?

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