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AddSlate: Worst part of oil spill could be return of Big Ethanol

The BP oil spill has reminded us that whether we love ethanol or hate it, it's still loads better than crude oil. Or at least that's what the corn ethanol lobbies would have us believe, according to Slate.

AddThe Oil Drum presents one vision of the oilpocalypse in the Gulf

BP and the US government haven't been as forthcoming with details about the company's oil spill as some of us would like. Lack of clear information often breeds speculation, and what follows is certainly speculation. That being said, those of us who write for ABG and you, our readers, often deal with absolutes: the most efficient battery design, the fastest charge time, the largest miles-per-gallon number. So we can't help but wonder, what is the absolute worst case scenario for the BP oil spill

AddGot hair? Donate your locks to make oil booms

For weeks, oil has been gushing into the Gulf of Mexico at a rate of somewhere between 5,000 and 47 zillion barrels a day and BP still has no clear plan to stop it. Now, everyone from the U.S. Government to Kevin Costner to those fellas down in Florida with the hay are doing their part to clean up the mess. Add to that list a group of young graphic designers who got together in Belfast, Maine recently to shave the heads of townspeople and make hair booms to help sop up the crude.

40BP "buzz" rating falls below Toyota after oil spill

British consumer research firm YouGov BrandIndex polls 5,000 adults every weekday to allocate a so-called buzz rating to some of the most important consumer brands in the world. The buzz rating of a brand can fluctuate wildly if, for example, a new product or service is announced. Let loose a piece of really good news and your buzz rating can hit 100 points. But negative news about a brand can send the buzz factor plummeting to minus 100 points. Sounds like TMZ-style ratings for corporations to

AddVideo: Hay, here's a great idea how to clean up the BP oil spill

CW Roberts employees demonstrating hay's ability to remove oil from water – click above to watch the video

57REPORT: BP finds big oil in Gulf of Mexico

Even during the recession, oil is hovering at around $70 per barrel. There are many reasons for elevated oil prices, such as emerging markets demanding more crude and market speculators. Perhaps the biggest reason of all, however, is that oil is just harder to come by, as all the obvious spots have already been drilled.

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